Cork staple Finbarr Cahill's Menswear to close city centre store

One of the best-known family-owned shops in Cork city is to close its city centre outlet after 40-years in business, citing the challenge from online shopping and access issues.

Cork staple Finbarr Cahill's Menswear to close city centre store

One of the best-known family-owned shops in Cork city is to close its city centre outlet after 40-years in business, citing the challenge from online shopping and access issues.

Finbarr Cahill's Menswear said it will close its Oliver Plunkett St outlet in the coming weeks to focus on its "larger and more accessible store in Carrigaline".

Brendan Cahill, who has for the last few years run the business founded by his late father, Finbarr, said continuing to operate a second retail outlet in the city centre was making less economic sense.

In a statement, the company said the closure of its city centre shop follows that of a number of family run retail outlets in the city centre and reflects the manner in which modern shopping has changed.

The growth of online shopping combined with more convenient access to retail outlets in suburban areas has proven to be a challenge for sustaining small retail business in the city centre, the company said.

The modern shopper seeks a more convenient overall experience, it added.

The second generation business, founded in 1980 by the late Finbarr Cahill, operated in Oliver Plunkett Street with a staff of four people.

Children's school wear became a major growth area and in the 1990s, the business invested in a larger and more accessible store in Carrigaline which the company said "provides a better overall environment for the growing school wear trade".

It has also invested in the online side of its business through www.cahillschoolwear.ie.

The announcement comes just weeks after the closure of another legendary Cork city store, Finns' Corner, following the retirement of the owners.

Finbarr Cahill worked in Finn's Corner for 20-years before setting up his own business.

Brendan said: "It feels a bit like the end of an era, particularly so close to Finns' Corner closing. Not only did dad work in Finns Corner for 20 years, before he opened his own premises, he also met my mother Angela there.

"Last year when my dad sadly passed away we were very moved by the many happy memories people had of their experiences in our shop over the years.

"There were many tales of First Holy Communion outfits from many years ago and the fondness of people's memories was very gratifying.

"The goodwill from the public and the nostalgia generated since the news began to emerge has been very heart-warming.

"We are very grateful to our many customers over the years and we look forward to maintaining those great relationships, as we continue to transition our business.

"Our aim is to provide the modern consumer with the convenience they need while maintaining the traditional customer service standards for which we are renowned."

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