Tech told pay for wind farms

Tech told pay for wind farms

Apple, Facebook, and Google are facing calls to help pay for wind farms needed to power their planned data centres in Denmark.

The companies have chosen the Nordic country partly because of its abundant supply of green electricity. 

A new report suggests the data centres will consume so much power that local authorities may have to resort to more fossil fuels to cover demand.

The Red Green Alliance, a left-wing opposition party with 14 seats in parliament, wants a ban on new data centres until a law is in place that can ensure no business “mooches” on Denmark’s efforts to achieve carbon-neutrality, according to a statement published by the party.

The Alliance may end up providing parliamentary support to a new left-wing coalition government after elections due by June 17.

The data centres are expected to consume about 7 terawatt-hours annually, the equivalent of 17% of Denmark’s electricity consumption in 2030, according to a report published earlier this week by the Danish Council on Climate Change.

Even when considering energy taxes and fees paid by the data centres, they will still cost Denmark some 400 million kroner (€54m) a year because of the costs involved in expanding offshore wind capacity.

Tech told pay for wind farms

The three US technology giants have all said they want their data centres to run on green energy and have also published plans for wind parks. But the council said those plans still lack detail and a firm commitment. 

It’s also not clear if the new parks would draw on state subsidies.

“Large global companies shouldn’t mooch on the green transition and even burden Danish power consumers with the bill,” said Soren Egge Rasmussen, the Red Green Alliance’s energy spokesman.

Apple is building a €887m data centre in Denmark’s western city of Viborg, which will be one of the world’s biggest, once completed.

Facebook has plans for a data centre near the central city of Odense, while Google has bought land for a site in nearby Fredericia.

All three companies have bought or reserved land elsewhere for additional data centres, although Facebook said last month it would drop plans for a second one for the time being.

In Ireland, Apple cancelled plans for a data centre in Athenry following objections and long delays in the planning system.

Bloomberg. Additional reporting Irish Examiner

More on this topic

New fines and break-ups suggested to tackle tech giants’ advertising dominanceNew fines and break-ups suggested to tackle tech giants’ advertising dominance

Facebook launch ad campaign to help users spot fake newsFacebook launch ad campaign to help users spot fake news

Facebook will tell users if they are about to share an old news articleFacebook will tell users if they are about to share an old news article

Ben & Jerry’s latest company to pull advertising from Facebook over racismBen & Jerry’s latest company to pull advertising from Facebook over racism


More in this Section

Debenhams workers in Cork, Limerick and Dublin set to picket stores todayDebenhams workers in Cork, Limerick and Dublin set to picket stores today

Ryanair, EasyJet and BA end legal action as UK scraps quarantine ruleRyanair, EasyJet and BA end legal action as UK scraps quarantine rule

Donohoe hints at longer Covid-19 wage scheme durationDonohoe hints at longer Covid-19 wage scheme duration

Taxi drivers demand mandatory mask-wearing by passengersTaxi drivers demand mandatory mask-wearing by passengers


Lifestyle

All eyes are on America for Independence Day - so what happens when the country's borders reopen again? Tom Breathnach gets the lowdownAltered States: What will tourism in the US look like after lockdown?

From days by the seaside to adrenaline-filled days riding rollercoasters, Leinster offers staycationers major bang for their buck.Staycations 2020: Leinster, where Eastern promises are delivered in full

Des O'Sullivan previews the diverse items that will spark interest among collectorsAntiques: From a sword to crystal chandeliers and a dictionary

Kya deLongchamps strikes up the band for some lesser copied American mid-century talentIt's July 4 so let's strike up the band for American designs

More From The Irish Examiner