Remote Signals takes Rubicon’s New Frontiers prize

Remote Signals takes Rubicon’s New Frontiers prize
Joe Perrott, Remote Signals, winner of New Frontiers 2017-18.

By Joe Dermody

Digital data monitoring company Remote Signals has been awarded top prize at the Enterprise Ireland New Frontiers Programme at the Rubicon Centre, hosted by Cork Institute of Technology.

Founded by Joe Perrott, Dan Stapleton and Tony Garvey, Remote Signals links data from fridges, motors and pumps to the internet. Its customers use this data to boost efficiency and unlock new revenue models.

“Winning this award is invaluable in terms of raising the company’s profile and its future fundraising,” said Liam Fitzgerald, New Frontiers programme manager.

“Joe Perrott and his colleagues bring huge experience from their days working with PCH in China and Europe.”

Last year’s winner, Paul Glavin of Glavloc Build Systems (GBS) has since expanded and moved into larger premises.

Construction firms in Ireland and UK use GBS’s rapid build systems to deliver complete buildings within six weeks.

Liam Fitzgerald adds: “The New Frontiers programme gives businesses exposure to the full suite of Enterprise Ireland supports, industry mentors, market research resources, and international offices.

“It is a very effective introduction into funding opportunities like the competitive start fund and high potential start-up funding.”

Participating on New Frontiers is likely to be the best strategic decision a business makes.”

New Frontiers Programme participants showcased their businesses last night in the Millennium Hall, City Hall, Cork.

The event was attended by some of Munster’s business leaders, banks and investors. The guest speaker was Tomás O’Leary, former Munster, Ireland and Grand Slam winning rugby player, and a co-founder of Told & Co, a designer watch brand.

This year’s other winners included: Dr Nusrat Sanghamitra of CyCa OncoSolutions, Most Innovative Business Idea; Kieran Gleeson, Freight Station, Best Business Plan; and James Gale, StampOwl, Best Video.

In all, 13 businesses participated in the 2017-18 New Frontiers programme.

The entrepreneur development programme is funded by Enterprise Ireland. It is delivered in the Rubicon Centre, CIT’s on-campus business incubator. No equity is taken in participant businesses.

Previous programme participants included successful businesses such as Abtran, Aspira, Cully and Sully, Crest Solutions, Treemetrics and Radisens Diagnostics.

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