GAA sees gate receipts rise €2.5m in 2012

The GAA's annual accounts for 2012 show how lucrative last September's All-Ireland SHC final replay was to the Association.

GAA sees gate receipts rise €2.5m in 2012

The GAA's annual accounts for 2012 show how lucrative last September's All-Ireland SHC final replay was to the Association.

The rematch between Kilkenny and Galway brought in €2.8m, but as ticket prices for the game had been reduced from €80 to €50, the GAA missed out on additional revenue of upwards of €1m.

The Association took in €2.5m more in gate receipt income in 2012 (€26.7m in total) compared to the previous twelve months.

There was a 12% increase in attendance figures - or 80,000 overall - for All-Ireland Championship fixtures in both codes. The average crowd was over 16,542.

Speaking to the Association's website, GAA Financial Director Tom Ryan said: "The number of people going to games last summer was by and large unchanged from 2011 and the revenues that we earned were only marginally down.

"On both of those fronts it is a stable year and in the current environment in which we are operating stable is a positive. We are very happy in that regard."

With the 2011 figures relating to a 10-month period (January to October), a number of the increases in the GAA's 2012 accounts can be credited to the full calendar year they are based on.

Overall revenue figures are up almost €6m, from €46m in 2011 to €52.7m across the twelve-month period of 2012. Income from the All-Ireland Senior Championship was €10.94m, compared to the €10.64m generated by the Hurling Championship.

Given the competition posed to the GAA last summer by high profile TV events like the European Soccer Championships and the Olympic Games, Ryan was pleased with the money brought in by gate receipts over the Championship campaign.

"They (other sporting events) certainly posed a potential challenge to us over the course of the year. It’s very difficult to say that they had no impact," he admitted.

"It’s very difficult to say that we would have done even better if they hadn’t been on, but certainly they didn’t have a perceptibly negative impact on how we fared."

Heading up the GAA's list of annual costs are their payments to provinces, counties and other units within the Association (€11.3m).

There was also an increase (€1m) in funding for Games Development to €10m and payments on Player Welfare Projects went up from €2.9m to €3.5m. The total amount for Match Day Costs was €9.5m, and €2.4m was paid out for Team Costs.

Ryan added: "19% of the revenue (€57m) is spent on the direct staging of matches and the costs of putting on games on a Sunday.

“After that, we distribute upwards of 20% back to counties, clubs and provinces. A further 20% goes to medium and long-term development of the games both in Ireland and overseas, including the deployment of over 200 coaches nationwide.

“The cost of running the Association absorbs about 16% of every euro that is paid through the turnstiles. After that, 17% went on capital projects.”

The GAA accounts for 2012 can be viewed in full here.

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