A prince’s lament

With the torrent of news last week from Washington DC and London, it was possible to miss the poignant, almost heartbreaking, cry of a man who, with his carefree youth behind him, looks down the road ahead and spies the encroaching uncertainties of middle age and, it seems, the unending agonies of a troubled world.

A prince’s lament

With the torrent of news last week from Washington DC and London, it was possible to miss the poignant, almost heartbreaking, cry of a man who, with his carefree youth behind him, looks down the road ahead and spies the encroaching uncertainties of middle age and, it seems, the unending agonies of a troubled world.

It was Britain’s Prince Harry who, during a tour of charity projects in South Africa, told a student that he “often woke up and felt overwhelmed by too many problems in the world... Sometimes it’s hard to get out of bed in the mornings because of all the problems.”

There was a time when Britain’s royals kept their feelings to themselves, partly to preserve the mystique that held the constitutional monarchy in its untouchable place and also, no doubt, to protect it as much as possible from mockery.

Queen Elizabeth II’s grandchildren, and some of her children, have scant regard for this restraint. Like others in Celebrityland, they feel the need to demonstrate their ordinariness. How many of us can say honestly that we’ve never experienced a horrid morning such as Harry describes?

For some, it might be the overwhelming problem of not having a home with an actual bed out of which to get. Uneasy rests the head that, in this case, will never wear the crown.

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