River levels to be monitored overnight as Cork remains at risk of flooding

The local authority said the city will continue to experience heavy rain and strong winds for the rest of the day
River levels to be monitored overnight as Cork remains at risk of flooding

Flooding in Clonmel, Co Tipperary. Picture: Billy O'Riordan.

River levels across the south will be monitored overnight amid ongoing concerns of flood risk with more rain forecast until 6pm tomorrow.

Despite downpours of almost 80mm today, the region escaped significant flooding with few reports of property damage.

Flooding in Clonmel, Co Tipperary. Picture: Billy O'Riordan.

Flooding in Clonmel, Co Tipperary. Picture: Billy O'Riordan.

But local authorities in Cork, Kerry and Tipperary are still concerned that water levels in already swollen tributaries, many of which have burst their banks, could rise overnight as sodden river catchments drain.

In Cork, the river Lee burst its banks at the Lee Fields, forcing the closure this evening and overnight of the Carrigrohane Road - a key access road to the city from the west. The situation will be reviewed around 9.30am tomorrow.

The ESB’s discharge rate from the Inniscarra dam - which peaked at its 225 cubic metres of water per second (cumecs) at 9pm on Monday - was reduced gradually throughout the day to around 155 by teatime today - the same level it was at early last week.

Flooding closes sections of the Lee Road, the Cloghroe Road and the Inniscarra Road.

The Bride burst its banks at Aherla and the Shournagh flooded parts of Muskerry Golf Course.

Officials are closely monitoring levels on the Curraheen and Glashaboy, where pumping operations are underway to protect nearby housing estates which were swamped by flooding in 2012.

City council director of operations, David Joyce, said areas of Douglas, especially around the Woolen Mills, the community park and the ICA Hall, also escaped flooding thanks to recently installed flood defences.

In the county, localised road closures have introduced tonight in Fermoy and Mallow, where flood barriers have been deployed.

Council crews will be on standby in Fermoy overnight where river levels are expected to peak between 3am and 6am.

Cork residents warned severe weather event is 'not yet over'

Earlier today Cork City Council advised residents that the current severe weather event is "not over yet".

The local authority said the city will continue to experience heavy rain and strong winds for the rest of the day.

In a statement issued this afternoon, the council said: "The continuing adverse weather conditions will lead to further river flooding this evening."

Motorists, cyclists and pedestrians are advised to watch out for fallen trees and debris as well as significant surface water across the city and county.

City Hall said: "Our crews continue to monitor the situation and take action where necessary.

"We continue to liaise with the other Principal Response Agencies and are ready to react to any situation which might develop."

Conditions are expected to worsen again between 7pm and 10pm this evening, with localised surface war due to heavy rain and overflowing rivers.

Cork escapes major hammering

Cork may have had a close escape overnight and today with the deluge of rain not causing any significant property damage, but cannot rest on its laurels with another surge expected this evening.

That is according to Cork City Council’s director of operations and services, David Joyce, who told the Irish Examiner that with all the focus on rain levels over the past 24 hours, the strength of the winds was now a concern.

 The River Lee has burst its banks and floods the fields after heavy overnight rain. Picture: Dan Linehan

The River Lee has burst its banks and floods the fields after heavy overnight rain. Picture: Dan Linehan

As power outages pepper areas of the city and county, Mr Joyce said that river waters were beginning to recede for the morning and afternoon, but that people should hold the line with their caution and preparations until tonight, with a similar event taking place.

“We had significant road flooding between 4am and 6am this morning. That has now passed as the rain has died down and the river levels have begun to recede. We expect a similar type of event between 7pm and 10pm this evening.

“Like this morning, we don’t expect property damage this evening, but we do expect there to be significant issues in relation to roads and conditions, whether they be closed then, or the ones that are closed today remain that way.

“Any roads we can open up will be done, but there will be some road closures until tomorrow,” Mr Joyce said.

The Carrigrohane Rd and the Lee Fields on Tuesday morning during severe weather conditions. Picture: Padraig Hoare

The Carrigrohane Rd and the Lee Fields on Tuesday morning during severe weather conditions. Picture: Padraig Hoare

Between 7pm and 10pm, localised surface water will accumulate due to heavy rain and rivers bursting their banks, he added.

More powerful than expected winds were now of concern to council and emergency services, with trees being felled and power outages throughout the city and county.

The 12th green on Macroom golf course. Photo: Alan Townend

The 12th green on Macroom golf course. Photo: Alan Townend

“There are a number of trees down across the city. We had been focusing on water but people must realise there is actually a yellow wind warning in place for Cork until 6pm. The wind strength has picked up throughout the morning and is gusting quite strongly.

“We would ask people to be very cautious. Where there are trees down, we are tackling them, but you may have a back road that isn’t reported to us yet. Trees or tree branches are a danger. The ground is saturated at present, so is very soft, which means tree roots becoming loosened during the strong gales,” Mr Joyce said.

 The River Lee has burst its banks and floods the fields after heavy overnight rain. Picture: Dan Linehan

The River Lee has burst its banks and floods the fields after heavy overnight rain. Picture: Dan Linehan

People could combat the dangers by being ultra-cautious while driving, keeping eyes peeled at all times, and slowing down to avoid aquaplaning, he added.

Sandbags and gel bags can be collected from Anglesea Terrace and Tramore Valley Civic Amenity Site.

If you are based in Cork City and want to report an issue, you can contact Cork City Council’s Customer Service Unit at 021 492 4000 from 9am-5pm or the council's out-of-hours emergency number at 021 496 6512.

For those in Cork county, fallen trees, flooding, and road damage should be reported to the council’s emergency out-of-hours number at 021 4800048.

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