Air travel numbers still low since green list published

Eoghan Corry from Air and Travel Magazine said there is a push for regions to be on the list.
Air travel numbers still low since green list published

Just over 13,000 people passed into and out of Dublin Airport last week, an increase of 1,000 on the previous week. Picture: Rollingnews.ie

There has been no significant increase in air travel since the green list was published.

Just over 13,000 people passed into and out of Dublin Airport last week, an increase of 1,000 on the previous week.

Travel is down 88% when compared with the same period last year.

Dublin Airport says in the week to July 19, it had an average of about 12,200 passengers per day, while the week to July 26 saw an average of 13,200 passengers a day at the airport.

The daa says in 2019, travel to the 15 named countries, which includes Greece and Italy, represented only 9% of its traffic.

The green list was published on July 21.

Eoghan Corry from Air and Travel Magazine told Newstalk's Pat Kenny air passenger numbers remain very low despite the green list.

"Same numbers, about 13,000 going through Dublin Airport, between 80 and 100 flights a day.

"Some of the companies reacting to the green list, for instance TUI - the big tour operator - put on a Greek programme from a second week in August.

"And Ryanair put on some extra green flights, but it hasn't made a huge amount of difference.

"There is a parallel world where people are travelling and the green list publication - there's only one really significant inbound country on that, Italy, about 400,000 inbound... and Malta, Cyprus, Greece would all count as Mediterranean destinations.

What is most interesting is what will happen the next time the green list is up.

"A lot of talk that regions should be included - in fact a region is included, Greenland, is outside the European Union but it's a region of Denmark.

"Whereas the Canary Islands has a very low rate".

"The re-opening of borders is always a sort of a stop-start, very 'be careful as you go' project - but most of the European countries are keeping to it.

"The spiking that has been quite spectacular over the last few days has pushed some of the European countries - Spain being one of them, Portugal was already there - over the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control's metric of 20 cases per 100,000 in the last 14 days."

"The big question when we come up on August 10th is will we take the same metric, which is better than Ireland, and the number of countries in that list is going to come down - for instance, somewhere like Lithuania's fallen off it and Malta's fallen off it.

"Or will we take the approach of adopting the regions?"

"The Spaniards particularly are lobbying very, very hard that regions is the way forward.

"And they would say that, wouldn't they - because 13% of their GDP is tourism".

"The problem people are looking at now is inconsistency: if you have a policy stick to it - Ireland bears credit for that.

"Some of us would be very critical that we just weren't willing to move with the rest of Europe.

"At least there aren't the inconsistencies there".

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