Lecturer to explain the forensics of finding Thomas Kent

The archaeological and forensic detective work used to locate and identify the remains of executed 1916 rebel Thomas Kent’s remains will be explained in Cork this week.

Lecturer to explain the forensics of finding Thomas Kent

The centenary of Kent’s death and swift burial at Cork Military Detention Barracks was marked earlier this month.

The free public lecture at University College Cork next Thursday will hear from the experts who helped last year to confirm the burial spot and then establish that the remains found in the shallow grave were those of the north Cork Irish Volunteers’ leader.

Thomas Kent was given a State funeral in his native Castlelyons near Fermoy last September, more than 99 years after his court martial and execution in May 1916.

Jens Carlsson will explain the genetic analyses used to verify that the remains located in the grounds of Cork Prison last summer were his.

“Many have heard about genetic identification methods used by forensic laboratories across the world. However, the Thomas Kent case turned out to be a very challenging task that demanded development of novel genetic identification methods,” said Dr Carlsson, a lecturer at University College Dublin’s school of biology and environmental science.

Archaeologist Tom Condit of the Department of Arts, Heritage, and the Gaeltacht’s National Monuments Service will speak about the geophysical survey techniques used to confirm where the remains lay.

Members of the public had an opportunity on the centenary of his death to visit the prison cell where Thomas Kent spent his last night, and to see the spot where he laid buried for almost a century.

The ‘CSI 1916’ lecture takes place at the Boole 4 lecture theatre in UCC at 8pm on Thursday, June 2, and no booking is required.

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