‘Roving cameras’ to monitor illegal dumping blackspots in Kerry

Six cameras are to be placed in illegal dumping blackspots in top tourism areas in Kerry.

The cameras are being purchased by Kerry County Council and will be hidden in a bid to catch offenders in the act.

Described as “roving cameras”, they will be used in different locations where problems regularly occur.

Up to now, despite using cameras, the council has been finding it difficult to catch those responsible for — what is claimed to be — a worsening problem.

Sinn Féin councillor Toireasa Ferris blamed the privatisation of waste management and collection. She claimed people cannot afford to pay the high cost of rubbish collection and disposal.

The council had made the wrong decision in getting out of a waste service it had provided for a very long time, she said.

“We’re partially responsible for the dumping. The increase in illegal dumping is because we got out of public waste collection and left people without a service,” Ms Ferris said.

There have also been calls on council management to introduce a system of checking on how houses, which do not have a waste collection service, dispose of their rubbish.

Legislation which will give local authorities the power to call on all households, due to be introduced next summer, was welcomed.

Director of services John Breen said the council had previously audited its own housing stock for rubbish disposal and found it a useful exercise.

Fianna Fáil councillor Norma Foley highlighted a number of areas around Tralee which had problems with illegal dumping — especially in the Short Mountain area outside the town — and called for cameras to be located there.

Independent councillor Sam Locke urged the council to name and shame people caught dumping.

Also, in the wake of the Munster football final replay between Cork and Kerry in Killarney at the weekend, council staff and Tidy Towns volunteers were promptly out collecting rubbish from the streets of the town.

Hundreds of litter bags and bins were also provided at Fitzgerald Stadium.

Meanwhile, the council is working with a number of hotels and caravan and camping sites in a bid to reduce waste. The council’s environmental protection unit is also preparing a training day for hotel staff with a particular focus on reducing food waste.

The unit is also working with the Environmental Protection Agency and the St Vincent de Paul Society on reducing food waste from supermarkets.

The council will also be implementing the national anti-gum litter campaign in Tralee on July 27 and monitoring will continue until the end of September.

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