Tayto launches new online store and delivery service with An Post

Tayto launches new online store and delivery service with An Post

Tayto has launched a new online store to deliver crisps, snacks and merchandise door-to-door.

In an exclusive partnership with An Post, Tayto has said the online store will be available all year round to deliver crisps in time for birthdays and 'Crispmas'.

Shoppers can use taytocrisps.ie/shop to buy crisps or Tayto merchandise for themselves of friends all around the country.

The crisp brand said those who want to send crisps out of the country can do so from their local post office.

Carol McCaghy, Senior Brand Manager for Tayto, said: “We are delighted to offer online sales within Ireland. We saw high demand for our merchandise and crisps at our pop up shops; this coupled with the growth of online shopping made it inevitable for us to enter this arena.

"Mr. Tayto is very excited to offer this service and we hope to expand our offerings and shipping areas in the future.”

Gilles Ferrandez, Commercial Director Parcels, An Post said “What a great present to receive in the mail this Christmas! We’ll make sure these precious Tayto gifts reach loved ones near and far safely.

"It’s best to get ordering early and to leave plenty of time for posting Tayto onwards to family and friends, in good time for Christmas.


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