Profits at tickets.ie firm fall sharply

Gordon Deegan

Profits at the owner of tickets.ie, the firm best known for selling GAA tickets online, dropped last year.

Profits for Oshi Software Ltd fell sharply to €53,117 in the 12 months to the end of March from almost €239,100 in the previous year.

Businessman John O’Neill first set up the business in 2004.

It is now Ireland’s largest independent ticket retailer and largest sporting ticketing retailer with a website that generates 9.1m impressions a year.

The company is the main online ticket seller for GAA, including matches in the revamped championships.

The company processes 2.7m tickets a year and has 370 stores across its retail network. Accumulated profits at the end of March last year totalled €1.19m.

The company’s cash pile increased from €1.7m to €1.9m, staff numbers increased slightly to 23 and staff costs rose to €943,593 from €880,446.

Directors’ total pay increased to €176,977 from €163,131, including €161,977 in pay and €15,000 in pension contributions.

The accounts show the company received a grant of €21,500 from Enterprise Ireland for research and development.

The loan would be repayable if the company breaches any of the conditions in the letter of of offer dated April 2016.

In the past, Mr O’Neill had said he had turned down offers to buy the company and it was now well established.

He had said that the Enterprise Ireland grant was a vote of confidence in the company’s future plans.


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