Son ‘broke barring order’ to get in to parents’ home

A couple in their 80s who are cocooning in their own home had to contend with their adult son trying to get in to the house in breach of a barring order.
Son ‘broke barring order’ to get in to parents’ home

A couple in their 80s who are cocooning in their own home had to contend with their adult son trying to get in to the house in breach of a barring order.

That was the allegation made in the case against a man who appeared at an in camera hearing of Cork District Court.

Garda Ken O’Day arrested the accused at 11.20am on Sunday and charged him later in the day with breaching a barring order by putting his mother and father in fear.

When charged and cautioned that he did not have to make a reply but that anything he might say would be taken down and given in evidence against him, the defendant gave a lengthy reply: “I did not threaten them in any way. All I asked was for some money for credit for my phone and wondered why they would not let me in for a cup of tea and made me shout at them through the window so they could hear me. I reminded her I smashed the window in ’84.”

Joseph Cuddigan, solicitor, said that reference to 1984 was incorrect and related to a more recent incident.

Sergeant Gearóid Davis said there was no objection to bail being granted to the 49-year-old.

Mr Cuddigan said even though he was representing the defendant he had received a phonecall from the defendant’s parents.

“All they want is that [defendant] would stay away from the house,” the solicitor said.

Mr Cuddigan said that the parents of the accused were in isolation as a result of Covid-19 restrictions. They are both aged 87.

Judge Olann Kelleher reminded the accused that once he signed his bail bond he would be at risk of jail if he breached the conditions, namely staying out of the area of Co Cork where his parents live and having no contact, direct or indirect with them.

The judge said to the accused: “I know you are not a violent man but if you put yourself in that situation you will end up in jail.”

Mr Cuddigan said that the accused should also take his prescribed medication. The defendant said: “I am sick of it now, it doesn’t have any effect on me.”

Judge Kelleher said there was a suggestion that the defendant showed up at his parents’ home on Sunday as a result of not taking his medication. The defendant replied, “I don’t think so.”

The case was adjourned for a fortnight.

More in this section