Over 130,000 blood donations made across Ireland last year

More than 130,000 blood donations were made across Ireland last year, according to the latest figures from the Irish Blood Transfusion Service (IBTS).

Over 130,000 blood donations made across Ireland last year

More than 130,000 blood donations were made across Ireland last year, according to the latest figures from the Irish Blood Transfusion Service (IBTS).

Around 133,400 donations were made at clinics across the country in 2019, a slight increase on the 132,000 in the previous year.

Dublin saw the greatest number of donations, with almost 30,000 blood donations in the capital last year.

Meanwhile, Longford saw the lowest number with 615, a 30% decrease on 2018 figures.

Counties like Mayo and Laois saw more than 20% increases in the number of donations received across those counties last year.

“The donation figures for Irish donors nationally, at just over 133,000 for 2019, were in line with expectations,” explained IBTS operations director Paul McKinney.

“A combination of a successful marketing campaign - Everyone Counts - and the hard work of all our staff was key in ensuring that blood and platelets were collected , processed and distributed quickly and efficiently,” he added.

Last year saw 18,118 blood donations in Cork, a slight increase on the year before when 18,043 donations were received.

“Once again, Cork donors supported the Irish Blood Transfusion Service magnificently, helping the service maintain blood and platelet supplies to all Irish hospitals, and for that we are extremely grateful,” said Mr KcKinney.

IBTS area manager for Cork Maureen Gill, explained the impact donating blood can have.

“Donating blood has a massive impact on thousands of people across Ireland each week,” she said.

One in four of us will need a transfusion at some point in our lives so whether we know it or not, we will all be directly affected by the need for blood.

“Transfusions allow loved ones to spend extra time together when they’re battling illness, they’re necessary for surgeries, and needed daily in A&E,” she added.

“The simple act of giving blood is a way for a regular person to become a lifesaver.” The IBTS is the statutory body with responsibility for the national blood supply, established by Statutory Instrument in 1965.

The IBTS also provides testing and tissue services to hospitals and is responsible for the Irish Unrelated Bone Marrow Registry.

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