Equality commission 'concerned' about effect of housing crisis on asylum seekers in Direct Provision

Hundreds of asylum seekers who have been allowed to stay in Ireland cannot leave Direct Provision due to the housing crisis, according to the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission (IHREC).

Equality commission 'concerned' about effect of housing crisis on asylum seekers in Direct Provision

Hundreds of asylum seekers who have been allowed to stay in Ireland cannot leave Direct Provision due to the housing crisis, according to the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission (IHREC).

The commission, which released its annual report today, said Direct Provision must be abolished, but in the meantime, the practice of using hotels and guesthouses as emergency accommodation alongside their regular commercial hospitality operations cannot continue.

Emily Logan, IHREC Chief Commissioner said on a recent trip to facilities in Co. Monaghan her staff were concerned over the treatment of some people living in Direct Provision there.

Ms Logan said: "There are some Syrian refugees who are living in Monaghan who came here for international protection because they were living in a country where there is conflict, where there is war, and at the weekends they are being bussed out of their hotels and being put somewhere else for the weekend while the hotel is used commercially.

"So it's how those services are being provided in emergency accommodation which is what we are concerned about."

The housing crisis was also the subject of grave concern for IHREC which said systemic unlawful discrimination continues to take place in the rental market.

It claims many recipients of the Housing Assistant Payment are being filtered out by some landlords who are not interested in renting their properties to single mothers and people with disabilities.

More in this section

Lunchtime News Wrap

A lunchtime summary of content highlights on the Irish Examiner website. Delivered at 1pm each day.

Sign up