Irish family facing deportation from Australia ask for public support

An Irish family facing deportation from Australia have asked for public support as their visa ends on June 18.

Irish family facing deportation from Australia ask for public support

An Irish family facing deportation from Australia have asked for public support as their visa ends on June 18.

Christine Hyde from Dublin has asked people to share their story and sign their petition as they wait to see if the Immigration Minister will intervene in their case.

Christine said the family have until June 18 for the Minister to intervene in their case.

Anthony and Christine Hyde’s application for permanent residency was refused because their three-year-old son Darragh has cystic fibrosis.

The couple appealed their case to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT) and were given fresh hope when the tribunal recommended their case be considered for ministerial intervention.

In an update to the family’s petition on Change.org, Christine urged the public to support their campaign to remain in Australia.

She said: “We have received a decision from the AAT referring our matter to the Minister for Home Affairs to consider exercising his discretionary powers to intervene in their case and grant them a visa.

“The AAT have referred the matter based on my unique and value skillset to my regional community, the overwhelming support from the Australian community and our son’s involvement in research projects aimed at improving the treatment of cystic fibrosis patients

Because our visa application has been refused we now only have until June 18 for the Minister to intervene.

“We are waiting on clarification on the exact date as to when our bridging visa will end.

“Please share our story and help us get his attention.”

A spokeswoman for the Department of Home Affairs said they do not comment on individuals cases when contacted.

The family were given some fresh hope earlier this month after Immigration Minister David Coleman chose to intervene in a similar case.

Mr Coleman granted permanent residency to Kinley Wangchuk, 18 and his family who were facing deportation back to Bhutan because of his hearing problems.

Christine and Anthony Hyde moved from Dublin to Australia in 2009 and the family’s plight has made headlines across Australia where there is strong support for their case.

Over 74,000 people have signed a petition calling for the Hydes to be allowed to remain in Australia.

One supporter wrote the family’s Change.org page: “This family must stay in Australia. This beautiful little boy was born here so he is a Australian. How very cruel to send him away from here. I am so very ashamed of the ministers to do this."

Christine works as an assistant principal at a local primary school and Anthony is a part-time bus driver.

The couple applied for permanent residency in 2015 before Darragh was born.

Shortly after his birth, the toddler was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis and their application was rejected on the basis that Darragh would be a burden on the state.

The family argued that Darragh’s condition is mild and have doctors reports to back that up.

They also argued that Darragh is Australian born and therefore should not be deported.

Explained Christine:

Darragh is Australian –he was born in Australia and has never set foot out of Australia. He’s never been to Ireland. It’s really unfair.

A child born in Australia does not automatically become a citizen unless their parents are already citizens. They cannot apply for citizenship until they are 10 years old.

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