Deirdre Clune backs scheme to help workers with terminal cancer

A scheme proposed by an Irish MEP to help workers with terminal cancer is being considered by the European Parliament.

Deirdre Clune backs scheme to help workers with terminal cancer

By Dan Buckley

A scheme proposed by an Irish MEP to help workers with terminal cancer is being considered by the European Parliament.

Deirdre Clune’s pilot project aims to tackle the lack of data on the employment status of people living with metastatic cancer, where a tumour has spread from its origin.

It has been accepted by the Employment Committee of the parliament and will be voted on later this month.“This was a significant first step for the proposal this week,” said Ms Clune.

“Although metastatic cancer remains incurable, survival is increasing in many tumour types. Remaining in work is a personal priority or economic necessity for many patients.”

The Ireland South MEP is seeking EU funds for the pilot project to gather data on the employment status of people with metastatic cancer, with a focus on breast cancer patients to assist in designing better policies and service provision.

“Better data on this issue is urgently needed to improve policy design, service provision, and fight discrimination for this neglected group.

“I believe it is very important that people suffering from metastatic cancer continue to have the opportunity to be part of and contribute to the workforce”, said Ms Clune, who launched the Dying to Work Campaign at the European Parliament in March.

Meanwhile, the world’s first clinical trial evaluating anti-inflammatory use at the time of surgery in colon cancer patients has been published in the scientific journal BMC Cancer.

The research successfully tested an anti-inflammatory agent with anti-cancer properties known as ‘taurolidine’ in the Surguvant trial which was funded by its manufacturer, the Swiss company Geistlich Pharma.

The research was undertaken by researchers at RCSI in Dublin with the Cork University Hospital group — UCC Mercy University Hospital and the Bon Secours Hospital Cork — led by Professor Paul Redmond.

We are delighted that this important clinical trial could be performed in Ireland.

“Now that we have proven the safety of this treatment strategy, it remains to be demonstrated if targeting the inflammatory response to surgery will lead to improved outcomes for cancer patients,” said Professor Redmond.

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