Amnesty CEO brands Egyptian justice system a 'joke'

The CEO of Amnesty International Ireland has described the criminal justice system in Egypt as a "joke".

Amnesty CEO brands Egyptian justice system a 'joke'

The CEO of Amnesty International Ireland has described the criminal justice system in Egypt as a "joke".

Colm O'Gorman was reacting to news that Peter Greste, an Australian journalist working for al-Jazeera, was released and allowed to return home.

Meanwhile the family of an Irish teenager, who shared a cell with Mr Greste, have renewed their appeal for his release.

Mr Greste was freed yesterday after spending more than a year behind bars in Egypt where two of his al-Jazeera colleagues remain.

Security officials in Cairo say one of the other men could be freed soon.

Colm O'Gorman says the Egyptian justice system is a joke.

Mr O'Gorman said: "The problem is the Egyptian criminal justice system, it is very difficult to describe it as a justice system at all. More often than not, what we are seeing are sham trials.

"The criminal justice system there has turned into a joke, it's time it got serious about ensuring it is used to prosecute people who are responsible for crime, but not to prosecute people simply because they dissented against the government of the day."

Ibrahim Halawa was 17-years-old when he was arrested during a protest in Cairo a year and a half ago.

His sister Somaia says Peter's release gives them hope, but the Irish Government could be doing more to help free Ibrahim.

She said: "As it gives us hope, it does concern us that Ibrahim is not out yet.

"The Australian government was able to take their citizen out, it means that something was done that the Irish government has not done.

"Ibrahim is the same as Peter, but he was there after Ibrahim, Ibrahim is nearly 600 days in prison."

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