Sex assault victims to get choice of preserving evidence at units for 12 months

Sexual Assault Treatment Units are planning to allow victims of sexual assault or rape the option of preserving biological evidence for a year.

Sex assault victims to get choice of preserving evidence at units for 12 months

Sexual Assault Treatment Units are planning to allow victims of sexual assault or rape the option of preserving biological evidence for a year.

This will give them time to decide whether they want to press charges after a sexual assault.

There are six SATU units in Ireland which provide services to women and men who have been sexually assaulted or raped.

Doctor Maeve Eogan, Clinical Director of the Rotunda Sexual Assault Treatment Unit and the national SATU services, says the service could be up and running by January 2015.

Doctor Eogan said: "Our aspiration is to increase the amount of choice available to patients.

"At the moment the patients have to make an all-or-nothing decision, either to report a crime immediately after it happens or decide not to report that crime.

"Obviously people are making these decisions at a time of intense emotional stress and consequently we want to increase the options available to patients."

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