Limerick gets high-tech traffic-management system

Traffic-management in Limerick has gone high-tech with the introduction of a new system of on-the-spot fines and a pilot scheme whereby motorists can pay for parking electronically without getting out of their vehicles.

Traffic-management in Limerick has gone high-tech with the introduction of a new system of on-the-spot fines and a pilot scheme whereby motorists can pay for parking electronically without getting out of their vehicles.

All Limerick city traffic wardens have been issued with handheld terminals for issuing on-the-spots fines for illegal parking, which also enables information to be immediately transferred to a database at city hall.

The eight-strong team of full-time traffic wardens were issued with the handheld units today, which along with a back-office computerised administration package, were purchased at a cost of €43,000 from Impala Ltd.

Information is immediately processed from the handheld machines to a traffic-management database at Limerick City Hall, where customer queries can be rapidly answered.

At today's official launch of the traffic-management scheme, Limerick Mayor Councillor Diarmuid Scully said the new system would assist traffic wardens in their duties, greatly enhance customer service, and provide value for money.

"For the benefit of all of the customers who visit Limerick City to shop, transact business or recreate, it is vital that there are available parking places," he said.

"The introduction of this technology will serve to make parking-management more efficient with spaces freed up more frequently."

Limerick City Council has also introduced a high-tech pilot scheme whereby motorists can now pay for parking without having to get out of their vehicles.

The electronic parking payment system, known as ‘Park Magic’, works with the aid of a small bleeper-type device which the motorist places on the dashboard of the vehicle.

Motorists can buy parking credits by dialling a special phone number before exiting their vehicles.

The pilot scheme, which is being carried out in partnership with a Limerick software development company, is expected to run for two months.

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