Revolver contained no fingerprints, murder trial told

A jury in a Dublin murder trial has heard a .38 calibre colt revolver recovered by gardaí contained no fingerprints, the Central Criminal Court has heard.

A jury in a Dublin murder trial has heard a .38 calibre colt revolver recovered by gardaí contained no fingerprints, the Central Criminal Court has heard.

Detective Garda Christopher O’Connor told the court that when he examined the .38 colt revolver discovered by gardaí in fields near Kilshane Cross, he found no fingerprints on the gun.

When the black plastic bag which contained the revolver was examined, it revealed the finger print of the State’s main witness, Joseph O’Callaghan (aged 20). The print of his right fore finger was found on the refuse sack.

Brian Kenny, aged 36 of Kilshane Cross, Finglas, Co Dublin and Thomas Hinchon, aged 25 of St. Ronan’s Close, Clondalkin have denied the murder of 25-year-old Dubliner Jonathan O’Reilly of St Mark’s Gardens, Clondalkin on April 17, 2004.

Mr Kenny also pleaded not guilty to threatening to kill Joseph O’Callaghan on April 17, 2004 at Finglas, Dublin. Mr Kenny denies the possession of a firearm, a Berratta single automatic shotgun on May 10, 2004 at Michelstown Cottage, Kilshane Cross, Dublin.

He also pleaded not guilty to possession of ammunition on the same date. Mr Hinchon pleaded not guilty also to threatening to kill Joseph O’Callaghan on April 17, 2004.

It is alleged by the State that the deceased man was shot outside Cloverhill prison as he sat in a BMW car. A motor cycle drew up beside the car and a number of shots were fired through the car glass and struck Jonathon O’Reilly, mortally wounding him, the State alleges.

Detective Garda Christopher O’Connor attached to the finger print section of Garda Siochana told the trial that when he arrived at the murder scene on April 17, 2004, a green BMW car was covered in plastic sheeting.

"I noticed blood on the passenger and driver’s seat," he said. The weather was bad, he added. It had rained heavily that afternoon and the jury heard that these weather conditions hampered the external examination of the car.

After the car was examined for finger and palm prints, Detective O’Connor said there were negative results with no finger prints found on the outside of the BMW car.

The detective told the court that he also examined the .38 colt revolver discovered by gardaí in fields near Kilshane Cross and found no finger prints on the gun.

When the black plastic bag which contained the revolver was examined, it revealed the finger print of Mr Joseph O’Callaghan’s right fore finger.

The court had previously heard Mr O’Callaghan, who is the State’s main witness, showed gardaí where the gun was buried in Kilshane Cross.

Mr O’Callaghan alleges he was told to bury the gun by one of the accused men in the late afternoon of April 17, 2004.

Under cross-examination Detective O’Connor said that neither of the accused’s finger prints had been identified on any of the items he examined.

Forensic scientist, Ms Claire Greaney told prosecuting counsel Mr Shane Murphy SC that she examined various items including debris recovered from a field in St Margarets and debris discovered from Mr Kenny’s house at Kilshane Cross.

Small pieces of black leather recovered by gardaí from the garage floor of Mr Kenny’s house were consistent with remnants of leather found at a fire in a field near St Margaret’s in north county Dublin, she told the court.

Electronic engineer, Mr Oliver Farrell of Vilacom engineering consultancy company analysed a number of mobile phone numbers and their connectivity on the day of the fatal shooting.

Mr Farrell, the court heard, estimated the approximate locations where the phones were when they made the various mobile calls.

One of the phone numbers included that of Mr Hinchon. Between 1.50pm and 2.46pm, this phone received or made 16 phone calls.

These phone calls, Mr Farrell said were consistent with the radio base stations of Ballyowen, Palmerstown, Liffey Valley, the West Link, Fonthill and the Lucan Bypass areas in West Dublin.

The trial continues before Mr Justice Michael Peart.

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