U2’s ‘Joshua Tree’ tour is inspired by Donald Trump's win

U2 say the “desperate times”, with the election of Donald Trump to the US presidency, have inspired the band to tour their iconic album, The Joshua Tree, again.

U2’s ‘Joshua Tree’ tour is inspired by Donald Trump's win

The band will embark on a world tour for the 30th anniversary of the album, including a concert at Croke Park on July 22.

Speaking from his home at Danesmoate, in Rathfarnham, where The Joshua Tree was recorded, the band’s bass player, Adam Clayton, said the album changed their lives.

“It changed our lives at the time and it continues to,” he told The Ryan Tubridy Show.

“We just feel those songs are relevant again. We feel there’s unfinished business to bring those songs back out and give people a chance to see that tour again. I think, before The Joshua Tree, we were a local band doing good that some people around the world knew about, to, after The Joshua Tree, I think everyone knew about the band. It was great to see those songs, that we had worked so hard on, be accepted all round the world.”

Drummer Larry Mullen Jr, singer Bono, bassist Adam Clayton and guitarist The Edge on a photoshoot for ‘The Joshua Tree’ in 1987.
Drummer Larry Mullen Jr, singer Bono, bassist Adam Clayton and guitarist The Edge on a photoshoot for ‘The Joshua Tree’ in 1987.

Clayton said a similar climate to that which forged The Joshua Tree existed today, following the election of Donald Trump.

“During the 1980s, we had Thatcher in the UK and Reagan in the US, and there were some very dark forces at work throughout that time,” said Clyaton.

“On the record, we talk about the miners’ strike and what was going on in Britain, whilst also talking about what was going on in South America, while the US was meddling in Central American politics. So, it kind of had this duality and, in some ways, we are right back there, at the moment.

“It’s very hard to predict what the current US presidency is going to produce, but the signs don’t look good.”

Clayton said the process of democracy that brought Mr Trump to the presidency “seems flawed” and that the time was right to play the songs again.

“I think it certainly seems like these are more desperate times, in as much as people do want some values to be reinforced and that’s why we feel it’s the right time to go out and play this album again,” he said.

U2 perform ‘Where the Streets Have No Name’ in 1987.
U2 perform ‘Where the Streets Have No Name’ in 1987.

Clayton said Croke Park “felt like home” to the band and that they never tire of playing to their fans.

“We get treated very well,” he said. “We get looked after and pampered and moved around and fed regularly.

“At this point, the hardest part is being away from the family. It’s hard on the men with family life. But the actual process of performing in front of a willing audience is something that is never tiring.

“It’s a privilege. It’s enlightening. It’s vitalising. It’s one of the great experiences and I don’t think any of us would ever tire of that.”

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