Social media and blogs now covered on law course

The Law Society of Ireland has had to significantly expand its provision of courses to keep up with the sweeping changes in social media, blogging and technology.

Social media and blogs now covered on law course

While the society has been running technology-related courses for a number of years, demand has increased “exponentially” in recent times.

Following its “massive online open course” last year, ‘Privacy, a Human Right for the Digital Age’, which saw 2,682 people sign up from various backgrounds and 30 countries worldwide, the society realised the demand for information in this area, from the public and professionals.

“It confirmed to us there was a definite demand and a hunger for this, a need for legal solutions to deal with this rapid innovation,” Freda Grealy, head of the Law Society diploma centre, told the Irish Examiner.

This “massive online open course”, was preceded by another course in 2015, ‘Understanding the Law in the Digital Age’, which had 2,400 participants from 34 countries.

The Law Society of Ireland will this year run an extended Diploma in Technology and Intellectual Property Law, which includes an entire module on social media. This particular module will cover areas such as blogging and defamation, how to manage legal risks and social media and the employment relationship.

The topics of driverless cars and augmented reality will even come in for a mention.

“We are always looking for courses that are relevant and add value, and this whole area is one of the most dynamic and innovative ones, there’s such change, the whole development of the Silicon Docks and start-ups for example,” Ms Grealy said.

The Law Society of Ireland runs courses based on the demand from industry and what legal professionals are being challenged by in practice.

“We look at what’s happening in law firms. There are constant developments in copyright and data protection, there are developments all the time in social media, e-commerce, cyber security and financial-technology, that intersection where finance meets technology,” said Ms Grealy.

Legal professionals are coming back citing data protection and cyber security as some of their biggest challenges. Legislation is being drafted in an attempt to tackle online abuse and privacy issues in the virtual world, as there is no law in Ireland to deal with these issues.

“It is one area that the law will have to adapt and change, so on the course participants will be looking at what principles might apply now,” Ms Grealy said.

Other areas that will be touched upon in the course include, gaming law, online betting and domain name disputes.

There are 35 professionals in the associated faculty that will deliver the course, including experts from Facebook, LinkedIn, Digital Rights Ireland, and various legal firms. While the course, which starts next month, is designed for those in practice, it is open to other professionals working in these areas.

More in this section

Puzzles logo
IE-logo

Puzzles hub

Visit our brain gym where you will find simple and cryptic crosswords, sudoku puzzles and much more. Updated at midnight every day. PS ... We would love to hear your feedback on the section right HERE.

Puzzles logo
IE-logo

Puzzles hub

Visit our brain gym where you will find simple and cryptic crosswords, sudoku puzzles and much more. Updated at midnight every day. PS ... We would love to hear your feedback on the section right HERE.