Last respects for Edge’s mum and U2’s first roadie

In the early days of U2 when they were still known as The Hype, a mum of the band members used to drive them to gigs in her small car and even help them to unload their gear outside tiny venues.

That woman, mother of the band’s guitar ace The Edge, drove them in her yellow Volkswagen back in the 1970s when they were still teenagers, packing the fledgling band, their guitars and amps into her modest car.

On Saturday, in the north county Dublin suburb of Malahide, The Edge, his two siblings, and his dad Garvin paid tribute to Gwenda Evans, who passed away last week after a short illness.

The service for Gwenda in Malahide Presbyterian Church was strictly private, with no celebrities or showbiz stars — apart from The Edge’s three bandmates Bono, Larry Mullen, and Adam Clayton.

The Edge was accompanied by his American wife Morleigh Steinberg and their two children.

There was a security presence around the tiny church to ensure there were no intruders. The church held a little more than 100 worshippers and was packed out for the service.

Manager Paul McGuinness and his wife Kathy arrived first, followed by Bono and his wife Ali.

Adam Clayton and his dad walked up from nearby Malahide village where their old family home is situated. Adam’s own mum Jo died last August.

Drummer Larry Mullen and his partner Anne Acheson arrived just in time for the 11am ceremony.

It was no doubt a sad time for The Edge, real name Dave Evans, 50, whose mum had always encouraged him in his music career.

He was joined by his dad Garvin, brother Dik, who also played guitar in an early incarnation of U2, and their sister Gill. Dik later joined rival band The Virgin Prunes back in the late 1970s.

After the service Bono left carrying a mystery musical instrument in a case. There was speculation it was either a very small guitar or a ukelele.

Gwenda was later cremated in Glasnevin after the funeral cortege passed by the old Evans family home in Malahide.

Bono recently remembered how “Mrs Edge was always there for us. She used to pick up all our gear for the early gigs and was really our first driver and our first roadie. She was a great woman.”

Gwenda, a primary school teacher and an accomplished artist, was in her late 70s and came originally from Wales.

The family moved here when the couple’s children were young after Garvin was offered a lucrative job in north Co Dublin. Both The Edge and Dik were born in Wales; Gill was born in Ireland.

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