Mick McCarthy: 'Whatever has gone on in the past, it doesn’t affect me at all'

Mick McCarthy: 'Whatever has gone on in the past, it doesn’t affect me at all'

Mick McCarthy was delighted with the Republic of Ireland’s efforts in securing a second consecutive European Championship qualifying victory.

A 1-0 defeat of Georgia pleased the returning Irish manager but McCarthy acknowledged that there is still plenty of work to do ahead of a trip to Denmark in June.

“Two 1-0’s, two good results and you have got to win to gain momentum haven’t you?” the Irish manager commented.

“One really good performance and one job done. I think it is a little unfair to say there is a change of attitude with the players as I have only had them for a few days. Whatever has gone on in the past, it doesn’t affect me at all.

“I have had a great ten days with the players. They have been brilliant from day one. They have come in and been committed in training and done everything I’ve asked of them.

“We know we got away with one and made a couple of saves but we could have put three or four past them, to be honest. They are a great set of lads and some really good players. Jeff Hendricks and Conor Hourihane, both of them have scored goals and put in great performances. I thought Glenn Whelan put in an outstanding performance as well. He belies his age, wonderful and a great athlete.

“As for the tennis balls, I hope we didn’t lose concentration, maybe they did. It didn’t affect us, did it? If it had of done, I’d be stood here whinging about it.”

“Obviously, it is a real honour playing for your country so that was never something I was going to turn my back on,” commented experienced midfielder Glenn Whelan.

To get the phone call from the manager to come in and just push these young lads on, show them how good it is to come and play in front of these fans. I just tried to do my best.

“First half, I thought we did really well, kept the ball and had composure. Second half, obviously they got on top for a bit because we had a 1-0 lead and were holding on. It is definitely something to work on and we have to put two halves of good football together but it is nice to be back and give the fans something to cheer about.”

Whelan was effusive in his praise about Ireland’s positive approach and club mate Conor Hourihane’s winner when interviewed by RTE’s Tony O’Donoghue.

“I play with Conor week in and week out and he has done that quite a few times,” Whelan stated.

“I know the last twelve months have been a little bit difficult but with a bit of confidence, we will bounce back. Two wins, we will take that. Two clean sheets and two banana skins avoided, the pressure is on them (Denmark and Switzerland) now. We will go out and give it our best.”

More on this topic

Stuart Dallas talks up Northern Ireland’s never-say-die attitudeStuart Dallas talks up Northern Ireland’s never-say-die attitude

Portugal and Holland set to rely on Euro 2020 play-offsPortugal and Holland set to rely on Euro 2020 play-offs

Hughes hails Northern Ireland manager O’NeillHughes hails Northern Ireland manager O’Neill

How Irish and British nations stand in Euro 2020 qualifyingHow Irish and British nations stand in Euro 2020 qualifying

More in this Section

European wrap: Gareth Bale shines as Real Madrid start LaLiga with a winEuropean wrap: Gareth Bale shines as Real Madrid start LaLiga with a win

Diogo Jota: Maguire has a lot of quality but I know and trust Wolves defenceDiogo Jota: Maguire has a lot of quality but I know and trust Wolves defence

Celtic sign Republic of Ireland Under-19 forward AfolabiCeltic sign Republic of Ireland Under-19 forward Afolabi

France thrash Scotland in NiceFrance thrash Scotland in Nice


Lifestyle

Katarina Runske owns Anna B’s bookshop in Schull, Co Cork. She is originally from Stockholm in Sweden and also owns and runs Grove House restaurant and rooms in the West Cork village.We Sell Books: ‘It is a great lifestyle and I am very fortunate’

Five things for the week ahead with Des O'Driscoll.Five things for the week ahead

From Liverpool’s beat-pop to Bristol’s trip-hop, Irish writer Karl Whitney explains the distinctive musical output of individual cities in the UK, writes Marjorie Brennan.Sounds of the City: The musical output of individual UK cities

As landlords’ enclosures of villages and commonages during England’s industrial revolution drove landless countrymen into the maws of the poet William Blake’s “dark Satanic mills”, a romantic nostalgia for the countryside began to grow.Damien Enright: Great writers took inspiration from walking

More From The Irish Examiner