Unions call for fund to help workers impacted by Brexit

There are calls for a new fund to help workers impacted by Brexit.

SIPTU want trade unions to work together to be Brexit ready to protect members' jobs, wages and terms and conditions.

They are seeking a Brexit Adjustment Assistance Fund to support people most at risk from the impact of the UK leaving the EU.

The fund would be modelled on a similar set up to the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund, which helped almost 11,000 workers in Ireland between 2007 and 2016 at a total cost of €75m.

ICTU General Secretary Patricia King

ICTU General Secretary, Patricia King, told the SIPTU Manufacturing Division Biennial Delegate Conference in Castlebar: “This new instrument should be developed and implemented with the consultation and participation of trade unions as is the norm in other European countries with a good record in anticipating and managing restructuring and labour market changes.”

SIPTU Manufacturing Division Organiser, Teresa Hannick, endorsed the call, saying: “The only certain thing about Brexit is that employers will be looking to take advantage of any crisis.

“As trade unionists, we must work together to be Brexit ready to protect our members’ jobs, wages and terms and conditions.”


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