People who get concussed still affected a year later, study reveals

People who get concussed still affected a year later, study reveals

A new study has found that Post-Concussion Syndrome (PCS) a one-year post-injury in patients after they were treated for concussion

The mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) was more prevalent in women who had worse outcomes, the research revealed.

Post-concussion or mild traumatic brain injury symptoms include headaches, dizziness, depression and cognitive impairments. Symptoms in patients are resolved within three months for the majority of patients.

However, the study found that 45% of patients experience post-concussion symptoms for a prolonged period after the injury which include worse dizziness and physical functioning and fatigue.

Study findings, published in the Irish Medical Journal this month, also show that a lack of information on post concussion syndrome shows an under-appreciated problem for patients for whom additional services may be beneficial.

Up to 112 patients formed part of the study with the average age being 40 with the youngest age being 27 and the oldest 57 with 58% male and 42% female.

The study was carried out at Cork University Hospital Emergency Department which deals with up to 60,000 patients annually. The Clinical Decisions Unit, admits 2,368 patients, 7% of total hospital admissions annually.

Co-author of the study Seán Underwood said: “This study reinforces the evidence that PCS is real and burdensome. However, clinical implications of these findings are somewhat limited by the lack of effective therapies.

[qoute]Emerging evidence is suggesting that exercise and cognitive activity in a prescribed and graded manner may benefit recovery, but on the most part current rehabilitation policies are largely based on consensus, rather than evidence based.

“With the results of this study, we can however, better educate patients on expected trajectories of recovery.

“In conclusion, (these) patients treated in an ED short stay facility continue to suffer from (this syndrome) one-year post-injury, suffer from a reduced quality of life as compared to age-matched populations.

“Larger studies are required to reduce this under-recognised condition.”

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