Court orders internet providers to block illegal streaming of live football matches from next month

Court orders internet providers to block illegal streaming of live football matches from next month

People who watch live English Premiership football matches on illegal streaming sites on their computers, set top boxes and other devices will find the service blocked when the 2019/20 season kicks off next month following a court order.

Today in the Commercial Court, the Football Association Premier League Ltd was granted Ireland's first ever order compelling internet service providers (ISPs) to block live streaming of matches.

The order is against Eircom/Eir, Sky Ireland, Sky Subscriber Services, Virgin Media Ireland and Vodafone Ireland.

The ISPs were either supportive or neutral over the application, Mr Justice Robert Haughton was told.

Under the order, the content provided by the illegitimate servers or hosts, using streams from legal broadcast outlets, will be targeted in real time for disabling using the latest advances in technology, the court heard. It will be possible to block streams across several platforms and apps "in one blow", the court also heard.

The internet protocol (IP) addresses of the streaming hosts will be updated at least twice during match time so that the blocking can be enabled, Johnathan Newman SC, for the premier league company said. It will be possible to respond "within minutes" to the illegal streaming, he said.

The court heard similar blocking orders were obtained last year in the UK where a court heard the problem of illegal streaming of the games had become ubiquitous.

It was no longer just "a student on his couch with a laptop" as illegal streaming but had become so overwhelming that the bulk of infringements came from people with "set top boxes" plugged into their TV, counsel said. It was such that "perhaps a veneer of respectability" had crept into what was an illegal activity, he said.

In a survey of 2,000 adults, 36 per cent were willing to admit they accessed material they were not entitled to, 19 per cent of whom willingly admitted they accessed Premiership matches this way, counsel said. Some 51 per cent said they didn't feel particularly guilty such is the ubiquity of copyright infringement, he said.

The technology did not allow the identification of end users but the blocking technology was similar to that used when Ireland became the first jurisdiction to enable blocking of copyrighted music and films following a court order, he said.

Part of the order sought contained confidential information which would only be known to the court and the parties involved because if it was disclosed it would enable circumvention of the order, counsel said.

The blocking technology will be stopped after the games have ended and will be reset each week to be able to respond to the changing nature of each infringement, counsel said.

Alleged infringers will also be notified each week and will be required to notify the end users of the order. It will also permit alleged infringers to make application to the court for unblocking should any of their legitimate material be blocked.

Court orders internet providers to block illegal streaming of live football matches from next month

Asked by Mr Justice Haughton how effective the blocking orders had been, counsel said academic research showed, in relation to music and film, access to such material had reduced by 90 per cent while the overall rate of piracy (by hosters) had reduced 22 per cent, There had been an increase of six per cent take up of legitimate services like Netflix and ten per cent for the BBC.

One of the effects of this was to "bring to and end the mistaken belief" as to the legitimacy of illegal provision of paid-for streaming, counsel said.

The court heard a confidential exhibit, which is part of the proceedings, was known only to the judge and the parties because its disclosure could allow for circumvention of the order.

Mr Newman said the criteria for obtaining the order was clearly met and there were appropriate safeguards to ensure it did not impact on legitimate use of the internet.

Mr Justice Haughton said he was satisfied to grant the order and he noted from the UK case brought by the Premier League that the judge there said continued illegal streaming undermines the value of of the FA's rights and if unchecked was likely to impact on returns for the football clubs and wider sporting community.

More on this topic

6% of Irish internet users have lost money to cybercrime, CSO reveal6% of Irish internet users have lost money to cybercrime, CSO reveal

Children put at risk online: Parents facing a huge challengeChildren put at risk online: Parents facing a huge challenge

The net minders: How would policing the internet work?The net minders: How would policing the internet work?

Early to rise: Three young Irish influencers making their mark onlineEarly to rise: Three young Irish influencers making their mark online


More in this Section

New research study to explore long-term effects of repeated concussionNew research study to explore long-term effects of repeated concussion

Man appears in court in connection with Dublin robberyMan appears in court in connection with Dublin robbery

10 of 31 local authorities publish political donations given to councillors10 of 31 local authorities publish political donations given to councillors

Robert Lawlor found not guilty of threatening to murder ex-girlfriend's partnerRobert Lawlor found not guilty of threatening to murder ex-girlfriend's partner


Lifestyle

Sometimes I think we impose Christmas on our kids. A couple of weeks back, my wife and I were all about The Late Late Toy Show and going to see Jack and The Beanstalk in the Everyman Theatre.Learner Dad: I think we impose Christmas on our kids

For our food special, our Currabinny duo, James Kavanagh and William Murray, dish up their top festive side plates.The Currabinny Cooks: Festive side plates to dish up this Christmas

More From The Irish Examiner