Alcohol ban will be considered to halt air rage incidents on flights

Alcohol ban will be considered to halt air rage incidents on flights

The head of corporate affairs for the Irish Aviation Authority has said that banning alcohol on flights could be considered as a means to reduce the level of incidents of disruptive passenger behaviour on flights.

Paul Brandon said that it is accepted that alcohol is a contributory factor in a large number of incidents, but the initial focus of the new campaign ‘Not On My Flight’ will be to raise awareness of the actions that will be taken against disruptive passengers.

When asked on RTÉ radio’s Morning Ireland if aviation authorities would consider banning alcohol on flights, Mr Brandon said: “We will see if there is a need for further action.

It is absolutely on the table, but our preference is to focus on the awareness of the risk if they disrupt a flight.

On Tuesday, 13 organisations operating within the Irish aviation sector, including Aer Lingus, Ryanair, the country’s main airports, and the Commission for Aviation Regulation, signed a joint declaration, committing to tackling disruptive passenger behaviour on flights.

Disruptive passengers' incidents increased by a third in one year (2017-2018) and at least once a month the situation escalates to such a degree forcing the aircraft to perform an emergency landing.

“Safety is the priority of the IAA,” added Mr Brandon. “Flying should be a pleasurable experience. We are asking passengers to be aware of the disciplinary consequences.

“Disruptions can be very distressing for other passengers and for the flight crew.”

On the same programme, Ruth Thewlis of the Academy of Aviation which provides training for airport passenger services and cabin crew, said that training was of vital importance for flight crew and for ground crew.

Any campaign for dealing with disruptive passengers must include training so crews will know what to do, she said.

Mr Brandon said that further forums will be held to expand the campaign and that “anyone who can help will be brought into the tent.”

The 13 organisations that signed the joint declaration pledged to promote:

  • A zero-tolerance approach to disruptive behaviour where safety is a risk
  • The identification, pre-emption, management and reporting of disruptive incidents
  • The responsible sale and consumption of alcohol
  • Ongoing education and communication with passengers to continue to raise awareness of the risks associated with disruptive behaviour.

The signing of the joint declaration is part of the Irish Aviation Authority’s ‘Not On My Flight’ campaign.

The campaign highlights examples of unruly behaviour on flights, and the consequences for passengers and crew. Unruly behaviour can include intoxication, aggressive or inappropriate behaviour as well as not following the commands of flight crew, who are there to protect passenger safety.

More on this topic

Evacuation slide falls from airliner and lands in US gardenEvacuation slide falls from airliner and lands in US garden

EasyJet bids to double hotel room salesEasyJet bids to double hotel room sales

EasyJet shares fly higher despite profit turbulenceEasyJet shares fly higher despite profit turbulence

Qantas jet lands in Sydney after non-stop flight from LondonQantas jet lands in Sydney after non-stop flight from London


More in this Section

Storm Atiyah: Flights cancelled, trains delayed in Cork and KerryStorm Atiyah: Flights cancelled, trains delayed in Cork and Kerry

Gardaí renew appeal for information following fatal road collisionGardaí renew appeal for information following fatal road collision

Wild Lights at Dublin Zoo cancelled due to stormWild Lights at Dublin Zoo cancelled due to storm

In pictures: The first look at Storm Atiyah as it hits IrelandIn pictures: The first look at Storm Atiyah as it hits Ireland


Lifestyle

Overshadowed by its giant neighbours it may be, but the smallest of the main Blasket islands, Beginish, is no less impressive in its own right.The Islands of Ireland: The miracle of Beginish

‘The days of our years are threescore years and ten — Psalm 90How to tell an animal’s age in a heartbeat

We often hear how nature will do well, even come back from the brink of extinction, if given a chance and some human help.Birds of prey on the rise

In our country we still have places that bear no evidence of disturbance by man, that are in their pristine state and rich with all the elements that feed the spirit and deliver us into the world beyond the skin of the time and circumstances we live in.Unique ambience of Dursey Island under threat

More From The Irish Examiner