UK jobseekers look to Irish market

UK jobseekers look to Irish market

There were a record number of applications from UK jobseekers looking to work in Ireland in 2018 as Brexit draws closer, according to recruitment website Irishjobs.ie.

IT roles saw the largest increase in applications from the UK at nearly 50%, closely followed by construction, architecture, property and public sector roles, the website’s report found.

Visits from the UK accounted for 27% of total overseas traffic to the site in 2018, Irishjobs.ie said.

The website’s marketing director Safann Mac Carthy said: “As the Brexit deadline draws closer, Ireland is seeing a huge influx of investment from UK and multinational companies seeking to relocate or expand in Ireland.

“Equally, our statistics show that people movement is matching that shift. 2018 marks the highest increase we’ve seen in UK applications for Irish-based roles and the current political climate indicates that this growth is set to continue into 2019.”

Irishjobs.ie said that it correlated with IDA figures this month showing 55 significant Brexit-related investments made by multinationals in Ireland in 2018, creating more than 4,500 new jobs.

These investments look set to continue as Brexit draws closer, the jobs site said.

Ms Mac Carthy said:

Ireland offers stability, well-paid jobs, a world-renowned education system, and access to the EU. These are attractive traits for mobile professionals

She said Ireland’s burgeoning reputation as an IT centre for multinational companies was attracting UK talent.

“Equally, tech companies are actively looking beyond Ireland for talent to fill roles that require a niche skillset that may not be available in the Irish market,” she said.

Construction workers are also seeking work in Ireland.

“The current construction boom in response to the rapid population growth of our cities and towns has resulted in 21% year-on-year growth in construction vacancies. These roles are attractive propositions for UK-based construction workers eager to capitalise on rising salaries and the competitive euro-to-sterling exchange rate,” she said.

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