Kellogg's to adopt 'traffic light' labelling for cereals

Kellogg's to adopt 'traffic light' labelling for cereals

Kellogg's is to adopt "traffic light" labelling for most of its cereal packaging from early next year after consumers said the colour-coded scheme helped them make healthier food choices.

The food giant said the voluntary labels would begin appearing on breakfast cereal packs, including Coco Pops, Crunchy Nut, Corn Flakes, Rice Krispies, Frosties and Special K from January, with all products changed by early 2020.

Boxes sold across a number of European countries where colour-coded labels are not well known will not have the new design, leaving just under 80% of Kellogg's cereals on sale in Britain and Ireland carrying the traffic light system.

The company's UK managing director Oli Morton said the decision followed a survey of 2,000 people asking them about their attitudes towards labelling.

Mr Morton said: "Put simply, they said we should change and move to a full colour solution as they want help making healthy decisions.

We've listened and now we're acting.

Traffic light labels show whether levels of sugar, salt and fat are high, medium or low using red, amber and green traffic light colours, and is based on the amount per 100g.

Earlier this year, British consumer group Which? called for mandatory traffic light labelling post-Brexit, warning that inconsistent information on popular adult breakfast cereals could be misleading shoppers about how much sugar, salt and fat they contain.

Many supermarket own-brands use the colour-coded scheme, but Which? said giant manufacturers like Kellogg's were lagging behind, and leaving consumers trying to eat more healthily to be faced with a bewildering array of nutritional data and portion sizes.

Its researchers analysed 31 cereals, porridges and granolas and found they could contain more than three quarters of an adult's recommended daily maximum of free sugars in one portion - with the true sugar level not reflected on the packaging.

More in this Section

Free trade agreement ‘very difficult if UK does not comply with EU standards’Free trade agreement ‘very difficult if UK does not comply with EU standards’

Microsoft pledges to remove entire historical carbon footprint by 2050Microsoft pledges to remove entire historical carbon footprint by 2050

''Politically-sensitive'' costs of rents and health insurance rise''Politically-sensitive'' costs of rents and health insurance rise

C&C shares sink on news of CEO exitC&C shares sink on news of CEO exit


Lifestyle

Bryan Stevenson is the American civil rights lawyer who provided the inspiration for the newly-released film Just Mercy. Esther McCarthy spoke to him in IrelandReal-life lawyer Bryan Stevenson on inspiring Just Mercy

So I’ve booked my holidays. And before you ask, yes, I’m basing it around food and wine. I’ll report back in July, but I thought readers might be interested in my plan should you be thinking about a similar holiday.Wines to pick up on a trip to France

Esther N McCarthy is on a roll for the new year with sustainable solutions, cool citruses and vintage vibes.Wish List: Sustainable solutions, cool citruses and vintage vibes

They have absolutely nothing really to do with Jerusalem or indeed with any type of artichoke, so what exactly are these curious little tubers?Currabinny Cooks: Exploring the versatility of Jerusalem artichokes

More From The Irish Examiner