Aer Lingus announce extended summer service of Cork to Cornwall route

Aer Lingus Regional’s Cork to Cornwall route is to return with extended summer service.

The Cork to Cornwall service, operated by Stobart Air, will operate twice weekly from May 9 to October 6 this year with an additional 20% capacity.

Following the successful launch to Newquay in Cornwall this year, Aer Lingus Regional has extended this service for a longer season in 2018.

Cornwall Airport Newquay, just on the outskirts of the town, is also close to Truro, Cornwall's only city, and the famous Penzance and St Ives.

Cornwall includes a number of famous attractions, including the Eden Project, Land’s End, and a local culture and history steeped in Arthurian legend.

Commenting on the route, Graeme Buchanan, Managing Director at Stobart Air, said: “To meet strong demand, Stobart Air is thrilled to offer Cork passengers an extended summer service to the beautiful English county of Cornwall.

“Cornwall is a unique UK destination. For those seeking a change to city breaks in Edinburgh or Manchester, a flight from Cork to Newquay offers a fantastic mix of bustling country towns, gorgeous coastal scenery, and attractions for foodies, thrill-seekers and culture buffs alike.”

The airline aims to fly over 340,000 passengers on Aer Lingus Regional routes through Cork Airport this year.

Across nine routes in the UK and France, Aer Lingus Regional will offer over 275,000 seats and 3,800 flights during summer 2018 from Cork Airport.

- Digital Desk


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