Police caution parents of one-year-old boy who got heatstroke in locked car

The parents of a one-year-old boy treated for heatstroke after being left in a locked car in England have been given police cautions.

Police caution parents of one-year-old boy who got heatstroke in locked car

The parents of a one-year-old boy treated for heatstroke after being left in a locked car in England have been given police cautions.

Staffordshire Police said they had given conditional cautions to a 24-year-old woman and a 28-year-old man after consulting with the Crown Prosecution Service.

Both had originally been arrested on suspicion of child neglect after police were alerted at 5.50pm on Tuesday.

Conditions of the cautions according to the force include "both parties agreeing not to commit a further offence", and engaging with social services.

Officers had to force their way in to the car to free a visibly-distressed child after he was left for about 30 minutes at Wolstanton Retail Park in Newcastle-under-Lyme.

His parents were arrested when they returned to the car, which had its windows slightly wound down, as temperatures reached 25C.

The boy was taken to Royal Stoke University Hospital for treatment for heatstroke and dehydration.

In a statement the force said: "Following consultation with the Crown Prosecution Service both parents, a 24-year-old woman and a 28-year-old man from Stoke-on-Trent, were given conditional cautions for causing harm to a child.

"Conditions of the cautions include both parties agreeing not to commit a further offence, paying a fine and agreeing to co-operate and engage fully with family services and any interventions they deem necessary."

In a statement issued immediately after the parents' arrest, officers said the boy suffered no lasting harm, but the consequences could have been far worse.

Detective Chief Inspector Amanda Davies of Staffordshire Police's public protection investigation team said: "This incident could have easily resulted in a child dying had a vigilant member of the public not alerted emergency services.

"The boy was clearly distressed and the conditions in the car would have been stifling."

She added: "If someone is concerned about a child in a car they should contact police using 999. Likewise, if you are worried about an animal you should contact the RSPCA. Alternatively you can contact police on 101 or 999 in an emergency."

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