More pressure on Liam Fox over Werritty funds

Former British defense secretary Liam Fox was facing more pressure today over his role in soliciting donations used to fund close friend Adam Werritty.

Former British defense secretary Liam Fox was facing more pressure today over his role in soliciting donations used to fund close friend Adam Werritty.

Britain's Police and the Electoral Commission is being asked to investigate whether the former defence secretary and Mr Werritty broke the law.

Meanwhile, British Foreign Secretary William Hague signalled that the coalition would be looking at wider problems with the lobbying system in the wake of the scandal that engulfed Dr Fox.

The latest developments came despite Dr Fox finally falling on his sword on Friday night after a turbulent week for the ruling coalition.

Prime Minister David Cameron shifted Philip Hammond to take charge at the Ministry of Defence, while Justine Greening replaced him at Transport.

According to The Sunday Telegraph, the reshuffle was so hastily conducted that Mr Cameron contacted his ministers from a train platform surrounded by morris dancers.

Meanwhile, venture capitalist Jon Moulton is understood to have approached Cabinet Secretary Gus O’Donnell to complain at being “misled” by Dr Fox.

Mr Moulton said the Cabinet minister asked him to donate to Pargav, a not-for-profit company set up by Mr Werritty. He was apparently told the firm helped provide “security and analysis”, and was unaware it was funding Mr Werritty’s travel to meet Dr Fox on official trips.

The millionaire has also complained to the Conservative Party about the way he was treated.

There were reports that those giving money to Pargav had been promised anonymity, which could potentially be against tough rules on declaring donations.

Earlier this week, an interim report by MoD Permanent Secretary Ursula Brennan disclosed that Mr Werritty had met Dr Fox 22 times at the department and joined him on 18 overseas trips since he came to office last year.

They included talks with the Israeli ambassador, a dinner with the new US commander of international forces in Afghanistan, and a meeting with a defence supplier in Dubai at which no officials were present.

Mr Hague dismissed as “fanciful” the idea that Mr Werritty could have been running a shadow foreign policy outside the control of government.

“One adviser or non-adviser, whatever he may have been, is not able to run a totally different policy from the rest of government,” Mr Hague told the BBC’s Andrew Marr show.

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