A night to remember in North London as Spurs now daring to dream

When Heung Min Son smashed home the only goal of a dramatic game, to give Spurs a precious 1-0 lead to take to Manchester next week, the roar that erupted in their magnificent new stadium would have been heard loud and clear five kilometres down the Seven Sisters Road, deep in the heart of Arsenal territory.

A night to remember in North London as Spurs now daring to dream

When Heung Min Son smashed home the only goal of a dramatic game, to give Spurs a precious 1-0 lead to take to Manchester next week, the roar that erupted in their magnificent new stadium would have been heard loud and clear five kilometres down the Seven Sisters Road, deep in the heart of Arsenal territory.

While the Emirates Stadium will be hosting Europa League football again tomorrow , Tottenham’s sparkling new home is, as the once-derided adverts proclaim, the only place in London to watch Champions League football, and there could yet be a semi-final to be played here next if Spurs show the same grit and determination in the second leg at the Etihad next Wednesday.

Son’s goal gave Tottenham and their jubilant fans the result they deserved, after battling on against the odds. Hugo Lloris was their first hero, saving a penalty from Sergio Aguero that had been awarded controversially after VAR intervened to suggest Danny Rose had handled a Raheem Sterling shot in the 11th minute.

Spurs also battled on after Harry Kane was sent limping to the treatment table with a crocked ankle after an ugly lunge from Fabian Delph early in the second half, and claimed the reward for their persistence when Son shot past Ederson in the 78th minute of a pulsating night in North London.

Much was made in the build-up to the game about whether Tottenham’s supporters could make their new stadium as intimidating an arena as the Ataturk Stadium or indeed Anfield, where City crumbled inside barely half an hour after a hostile reception at the same stage of the competition 12 months ago.

The Tottenham Hotspur Stadium is mightily impressive, not least the Souyth Stand’s White Wall, an imposing 17,500-seater single-tier stand reaching into the night sky, situated at was once simply known as the Park Lane end.

Its inhabitants all held up blue and white cards in a choreographed move before kick-off, resulting in a mosaic that bore the club’s motto, To Do is To Dare.

And Tottenham dared to dream, to do to City what Liverpool did to them last April, racing into a 3-0 lead in 31 minutes, before finishing the job at the Etihad with a 2-1 win in the second leg.

It was always a tough task for Tottenham to replicate, certainly once Kane limped off ten minutes into the second half after Delph dived in on the ankle he had injured not so long ago.

The sight of Tottenham’s talisman being helped to the treatment room struck dread into their supporters’ hearts, but Kane’s team-mates did not lack heart or desire and eventually got their reward against a strangely subdued City.

They had gone at Guardiola’s men from the off, roared on by a huge crowd not only relishing their maginificent new home but delighted to be playing anywhere other than Wembley.

The noise at kickoff was deafening and the crescendo carried on into the early stages. City tried to impose themselves with composed passing from back to front, but Totttenham’s pressing game gave them some anxious moments, not least when the super-confident Ederson slipped as he attempted a long clearance.

But the first chance to break the deadlock was handed to City in highly controversial circumstances after 11 minutes, when a Raheem Sterling shot was deflected over Hugo Lloris’ crossbar.

Bjornm Kuipers awarded a corner kick, but a word in his ear from the VAR official persuaded him to study the pitchside monitor on the halfway line.

City’s small band of fans roared for the first time when Kuipers pointed to the penalty spot, but Spurs supporters soared in delight seconds later when Lloris turned Sergio Aguero’s spot-kick away to safety.

The French goalkeeper has had a lot of criticism after his well-publicised and costly errors in recent games, but this was the third time in eight weeks that the Spurs captain has saved a penalty.

With a sense of reprieve, as well as relief, Spurs went again, roared on by their supporters. It threatened to turn ugly as Fernandinho, Nicolas Otamendi and Aymeric Laporte were reprimanded for clattering Kane, and Sterling of all people pulled down Son on the edge of the penalty area.

The biggest round of booing was reserved for Delph every time he touched the ball, the England player quite clearly seen as the villain of the night after after his ugly stamp on Kane, who remonstrated with his assailant in uncharacteristically angry manner.

The hero of the night was undoubtedly Son, though, and his goal owed as much to the South Korean’s persistence as to Ederson’s inconsistency.

So often the Brazilian’s brilliance has saved City, but here he cost them with an expensive error.

Take nothing away from So0n, who made up for miscontrolling Christian Eriksen’s forward pass by chasing down the ball. Son just managed to keep it from crossing the byline fully — a fact established by VAR moments later.

Son turned back from the line, scampered into a shooting position, let fly with his left foot and his shot flew past Ederson, who should have done better than to let it under his body.

Spurs supporters’ celebrations were loud and long, despite the agonising wait for VAR to prove the goal’s legitimacy. And those same fans were singing long into the night after the final whistle.

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