House of the week: Four-bed on Rochestown Road in walk-in condition

A COUPLE on a home-hunt back 12 years ago had a roundabout way of tracking down their dream home — they went searching along a very particular stretch of road, one bookended with a roundabout at either end, and off they went, goal in sight.
House of the week: Four-bed on Rochestown Road in walk-in condition
33 Newlyn Vale, on Cork’s Rochestown Road, built in 1998 by O’Flynn Construction.
33 Newlyn Vale, on Cork’s Rochestown Road, built in 1998 by O’Flynn Construction.

Rochestown, Cork €485,000

Size: 170 sq m (1,820 sq ft)

Bedrooms: 4

Bathrooms: 3

BER: C1

A COUPLE on a home-hunt back 12 years ago had a roundabout way of tracking down their dream home — they went searching along a very particular stretch of road, one bookended with a roundabout at either end, and off they went, goal in sight.

What they found, almost under their noses, was 33 Newlyn Vale, on Cork’s Rochestown Road, built in 1998 by O’Flynn Construction.

The setting was within a walk of every amenity in Douglas village, via the famed Fingerpost Roundabout, while the city’s vital traffic artery ring road was a minute away the other direction by car, via the roundabout and junction near the 1990s’-built St Patrick’s Church.

33 Newlyn Vale, on Cork’s Rochestown Road, built in 1998 by O’Flynn Construction.
33 Newlyn Vale, on Cork’s Rochestown Road, built in 1998 by O’Flynn Construction.

The couple (she’s from Galway, he’s local Cork) had already been living along this well-populated stretch of road, at Belgard Downs, and the easy proximity to bars, shops and restaurants really appealed to them, when they set their trade-up sights on a very short and specific radius…a kilometre, give or take.

Funnily enough, they weren’t the only ones to leap-frog along these Rochestown Road estates, which were built in the 1980s and 1990s in the main, comprising many, many hundreds of homes in what back then was a burgeoning ‘suburb of choice’.

One of No 33’s owners, now a willing vendor, lists at least three of her Newlyn Vale neighbours who also have made the trade-up move out the road from three-bed semis in Belgard Downs. One even stopped off for a few years in another estate Delford, midways along the way, for an even more incremental house move.

33 Newlyn Vale, on Cork’s Rochestown Road, built in 1998 by O’Flynn Construction.
33 Newlyn Vale, on Cork’s Rochestown Road, built in 1998 by O’Flynn Construction.

“It’s a great location, it has everything we wanted,” says the woman of the house at 33, detailing extras within their recent lockdown 2km radius like the Harty’s Quay estuary walk, proximity of woods at Garryduff, and a local shop.

So, why move?

It’s the lure of the sea, simply as strong a pull for a Galway woman as for her husband who’s a seasoned, year-round sea swimmer. In fact, both are sea swimmers, and their two daughters now aged eight and 10 also love to take a dip, either in the sea at Myrtleville, or in the swimming pool at the Rochestown Park Hotel.

The family (plus dog) is bailing out for a home by the sea, at French Furze near Crosshaven, where they’ll have Myrtleville and Fountainstown beaches within minutes’ drive. The girls will go on to second-level school in Crosshaven, and the grown-ups will ‘work from home’ as much as possible: one was doing this before Covid-19, the other’s a partial convert, and they’ve been lucky enough at spacious No 33 to have a ground floor study they can both work from.

Thus, here comes No 33 Newlyn Vale for sale, listed with an impressed estate agent, Jeremy Murphy who give it a €485,000 price guide. It’s a very fully reworked and updated detached home, very different to how it presented when they bought it in 2008 as what appeared to be an ex-rental five-bed detached.

33 Newlyn Vale, on Cork’s Rochestown Road, built in 1998 by O’Flynn Construction.
33 Newlyn Vale, on Cork’s Rochestown Road, built in 1998 by O’Flynn Construction.

They did the wall moving and opening up thing, not once but twice; they made one super-sized master bedroom by joining two bedrooms to the front, with twin large windows and a very good sized en suite, adapted and enlarged from what had been an en suite for the ‘original’ master bed to the back.

They reduced the number of bedrooms from five to four, now all good doubles with one deep, dual aspect one added on to the side in a first-floor extension. Next, they redid bathrooms, flooring and finishes, and put in a new kitchen (in tulipwood with granite tops), and then they extended to the back with a glazed light and bright 13’ by 12’ garden/family room off the kitchen/dining room.

Also, they altered the flow of the main, linked living spaces changing it first to a ‘capital L,’ shape and then to a ‘capital T’ shape, and the front and back living room now can be opened up, or closed off, by sliding hardwood double doors. Those sliders are in walnut, a match for the 16’ by 12’ front room’s walnut floor, and this room also has a gas insert fire in a marble surround.

With over 1,800 sq ft, No 33’s in walk-in condition (the home-proud owners are looking forward to ‘having’ to do work to their next coastal home purchase) and the landscaped gardens are also tended, practical and family-friendly, with a mix of finishes. There’s lots of paved patio too, and the warm hues of that Indian sandstone are picked up in the colour of the garden room’s cherrywood floor.

33 Newlyn Vale, on Cork’s Rochestown Road, built in 1998 by O’Flynn Construction.
33 Newlyn Vale, on Cork’s Rochestown Road, built in 1998 by O’Flynn Construction.

Privacy

There’s excellent privacy, mature planting, two side access passages for front to back traffic, off-street parking for three cars, and a bus stop is a skip away on the main Rochestown Road, before the ‘end of the road’ roundabout.

The Price Register shows the most recent sale at Newlyn Vale was No 9, making €457,500 in 2019, and No 39 is also currently for sale, in more original condition, with a €415,000 AMV quoted.

Anything else at 33? Oh, yes, the couple also got rid of the stippled ceilings which are/were such a feature of homes in many of the strip’s ’80s and ’90s, back when this ‘decorative’ finish was liberally applied, by the tonne, spreading like a rash, in a roundabout way.

VERDICT: Always a happy home, the vendors are only happy to leave because there’s a draw to the sea.

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