'Appropriate replanting' will take place where council felled trees

The trees were removed along the road near the Angler's Rest pub in Carrigrohane, prompting a local resident to install six signs criticising the local authority
'Appropriate replanting' will take place where council felled trees

Deborah O'Connell installed six signs last week, criticising the city council for felling trees in Carrigrohane. Picture: Jim Coughlan

City officials have moved to explain a large tree-felling operation which prompted a roadside sign protest in Cork city.

They said "appropriate replanting" will occur along the road near the Angler’s Rest pub in Carrigrohane where local resident Deborah O’Connell installed six signs last week criticising the city council for the scale of the work and for doing it without consultation.

She spoke out after securing an arborist report, released under the Freedom of Information Act, which included recommendations to retain some of the trees.

But a council spokesman said while the report, prepared in December, did recommend the retention of some trees, a closer inspection by "a very experienced contractor" engaged to conduct the work in January led to a decision to cut them all down.

“The city council takes its responsibilities in relation to trees very seriously but is also very mindful of health and safety to pedestrians, road users and property,” he said.

“As is often the case, when on-site and engaging in tree works, additional observations were made on the health of the trees. These works were carried out solely in the interests of pedestrians and road users safety and were not a matter for consultation.

We have received only two complaints from residents. We do accept it would have been beneficial to inform residents of the necessity for carrying out the works.

“Some appropriate planting will be undertaken, taking into account avoiding any further potential tree hazards that could occur.” 

Posed a danger

Most of the elm trees were dead and posed a danger and so were removed, he said.

The ash trees were deemed to be in generally poor condition and with ash dieback prevalent here, removal was deemed the safest option, he said. 

The chestnut tree, which was recommended for retention by the arborist, was cut almost to ground level because of overhead power lines, which would require further regular pruning works, and of the three sycamore trees, two were growing at a 45-degree angle under a powerline, which limited their long-term viability and ability to grow into a natural shape, with the third closer to the road at a very busy junction, raising safety issues.

He said the hedgerow would regenerate quickly.

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