Met Éireann issues status yellow temperature and thunderstorm warnings for Sunday

Met Éireann issues status yellow temperature and thunderstorm warnings for Sunday

People enjoying the afternoon sunshine a Dunworley Beach in West Cork on Saturday. Picture: Andy Gibson.

Ireland first official August heatwave for nearly two decades will continue for one more day today, but heavy downpours are expected to replace the blistering sunshine in parts of the country on Sunday, as a thunderstorm warning takes effect.

A status yellow high-temperature warning for all of Ireland will be in place from until 6am on Monday. 

In general, Sunday is another hot day with the mercury likely to hit 25C to 30C by the mid-afternoon, though it is not expected to be quite so hot in the north and northwest.

This will begin dry and sunny in most parts of the country, but there may be a few showers in northern areas, some of which could become heavy.

However, through the course of the afternoon and evening, Met Éireann is forecasting scattered heavy and thundery showers across the country some of these with hail. 

Slow-moving downpours are possible, causing spot flooding.

The forecaster says some places will remain dry, but "hit and miss" thunderstorm activity with hail and heavy downpours could lead to spot flooding in some areas.

A status yellow thunderstorm warning for the whole country begins at 3pm on Sunday and will last until 3am on Monday mornng.

Alan O'Reilly from Carlow Weather says despite the expected rain, we'll have more fine weather before the end of the summer.

A couple sits on a bench in Rosscarbery on Saturday afternoon. Picture: Andy Gibson.
A couple sits on a bench in Rosscarbery on Saturday afternoon. Picture: Andy Gibson.

"A heatwave is five days over 25C, so many stations have now hit that status and some more will hit that status tomorrow," Mr O'Reilly said.

"Heatwaves are unusual in Ireland; we often see short spells of heat but we haven't seen one in a couple of years.

"It is an unusual event in Ireland but hopefully we might see some more fine settled weather just before the summer ends."

The Department of Agriculture’s Orange Forest Fire Warning, issued in response to “weather patterns and expected level of risk," remains in effect until noon on Tuesday.

New all-time August high temperature set

Yesterday saw Ireland's all-time maximum temperature record for August broken.

The temperature in Oak Park, Co Carlow reached 31.7C yesterday afternoon, surpassing previous records set by both Ballybrittas, Co Laois in 1975, and by Oak Park itself in 1995.

More water restrictions likely

Ireland has been experiencing high temperatures and hot conditions this summer as part of a series of rolling heatwaves across Europe.

There has been no significant rainfall for almost two months in Western, Central and Southern Europe, leading to droughts and wildfires breaking out across the continent.

Amid the soaring temperatures, almost 40 water supplies across the country are at risk of drought and another 60 are being monitored, with Irish Water “implementing measures to ensure taps keep flowing”.

Some 37 supplies nationwide have needed action to keep water flowing in taps, Irish Water said.

“In most cases, there is still no impact on customers but there are a small number of locations where overnight restrictions are in place. These include parts of West Cork, Kerry, and Galway,” it said.

Medical advice

Tourists and locals at Owenahincha Beach on Friday. Picture: Andy Gibson.
Tourists and locals at Owenahincha Beach on Friday. Picture: Andy Gibson.

The interim chief medical officer Professor Breda Smyth warned that people should take care when out enjoying the “exceptionally warm weather”.

This includes staying out of direct sunlight for prolonged periods as much as possible, especially between the hours of 11am to 3pm when UV is strongest, staying hydrated throughout the day and regularly applying sunscreen with a high SPF.

Possible impacts of exposure to high temperatures are heat stress, especially for the more vulnerable of the population; high Solar UV index and a risk of water related incidents as people go swimming in the heat.

 - additional reporting from PA

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