Irish Water lift boil water notice on 600,000 affected homes

Since early this morning, Fingal county council flushed the network in areas to remove remaining risks from the water network.

Irish Water lift boil water notice on 600,000 affected homes

Boil notices for over 600,000 homes have been lifted after tests by Irish Water concluded that there were no more threats to public health.

Since early this morning, Fingal county council flushed the network in areas to remove remaining risks from the water network.

Boil water notices were then lifted for parts of Dublin, Kildare and Meath.

The removal of the boil notices came after frustrations for families with young children as well as anger amongst communities over the lack of information. A number of people also fell ill. TDs now say they want a review of how the public health risk was handled by authorities.

Announcing the water boil notice lift, Irish Water said:

Irish Water acknowledge and understand the impact of this boil water notice on the 600,000 people affected and we sincerely regret the inconvenience.

“Since early this morning Fingal County Council flushed the network in key areas to remove the remaining at risk water from the network.

“The results of the Environmental Protection Agency audit were discussed with Irish Water and Fingal Council Council and the results formed part of the decision making process in lifting the Boil Water Notice.

The EPA will publish their audit and in consultation with the EPA Irish Water will work to implement the audit’s recommendations.

Nonetheless, Irish Water are still warning that people could be at risk. Officials said health problems could emerge. Symptoms of cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis begin about two to 10 days after being exposed to a source but may take up to 28 days. And people who are unwell should contact their GP, Irish Water said.

Earlier, Opposition TDs lashed Housing Minister Eoghan Murphy, arguing that he was trying to dodge responsibility for the water crisis.

“People are getting annoyed,” Fianna Fail TD Darragh O'Brien told the Irish Examiner.

"He [the minister] could do something, he has done nothing. This is becoming real serious. Over a tenth of the island is without drinking water. He has put out no statement or Tweet, and only referred to Irish water.

If he was opening a water plant, there would be a big entourage and the media there. He needs to try and manage the situation in the greater Dublin area but is absent.

But Mr Murphy defended his actions. His spokesman said he had spoken in the Dail twice about the water problem last week. He also rejected allegations noting had been done.

Welcoming the water ban removal, the minister also voiced concern about how water was being monitored.

"I am extremely concerned to hear that the EPA found no system was in place to respond adequately to process alarms at the water treatment plant serving a major part of our capital city and surrounding area," he said. "Irish Water must now work with Fingal County Council to ensure there is no repeat of this type of incident."

Minister Murphy has also asked the EPA to report to him.

Housing committee chairman Noel Rock also pledged he would investigate the water crisis and get answers.

“We will be reviewing the issues and looking for answers with Irish Water and other groups in the Committee on November 5th,” he tweeted.

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