High Court action resolved against State over migrant fishermen work-permit scheme

A High Court action against the State over a work permit scheme that was allegedly resulting in the exploitation of migrant fishermen has been resolved.

High Court action resolved against State over migrant fishermen work-permit scheme

A High Court action against the State over a work permit scheme that was allegedly resulting in the exploitation of migrant fishermen has been resolved.

The action was brought by the International Transport Workers Federation (ITF) over a scheme known as the Atypical Working Scheme for Non-EEA crew in the Irish fishing fleet.

The federation, in its action against the Minister for Justice, Ireland and the Attorney General claimed that the scheme resulted in migrant fisherman working on Irish registered trawlers were exploited, underpaid, racially abused, worked to exhaustion and in some cases have been assaulted to a degree that their working conditions are akin to "modern slavery."

The ITF claimed the scheme did not protect workers from exploitation and human trafficking.

The claims were denied by the state defendants.

The matter was briefly mentioned before Mr Justice Tony O'Connor at the High Court today.

The judge was told that following mediation between the sides the proceedings could be struck out with no order.

The Judge noting the public interest in the matter welcomed the outcome of the mediation.

The scheme at the centre of the case was introduced by the Government in 2016 following the exploitation of workers within the Irish fishing industry exposed in a British newspaper report.

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