Councillor charged with blacking out Cork street signs referencing Queen Victoria applies to have case heard in Irish

A councillor accused of blacking out Queen Victoria-related street names in Cork has applied to have his case heard in Irish - this application will be heard at the High Court in Dublin next month.

Councillor charged with blacking out Cork street signs referencing Queen Victoria applies to have case heard in Irish

A councillor accused of blacking out Queen Victoria-related street names in Cork has applied to have his case heard in Irish - this application will be heard at the High Court in Dublin next month.

This emerged today at Cork District Court.

Judge Olann Kelleher said the matter had been adjourned on numerous previous occasions in the district court for the high court to deal with this aspect.

It emerged today that the matter was to have been heard last week at the High Court but there was some difficulty and it was not reached. It is expected that the application will be heard in May.

The issue to be decided relates to whether there is an entitlement to have the case heard through the Irish language.

Diarmaid Ó Cadhla, 56, of 8 Upper Beaumont Drive, Ballintemple, Cork, faces five counts of criminal damage to street signs at three separate locations in Cork city.

He is charged with two counts of criminal damage at Victoria Road; two counts of criminal damage at Victoria Cross; and one count of criminal damage at Victoria Street, Military Hill, in Cork city on February 2.

Defence barrister, Pat Barrett, who represents the accused, said previously that one of his submissions was that the case should be heard by a judge fluent in Irish.

Two co-accused, Thomas O’Connor, 56, from 44 Mangerton Close, the Glen, and Tony Walsh, 52, from 25 Carrigmore Park, Ballinlough, both indicated not guilty pleas and their cases.

A group called Cork Street Names Campaign was set up to have streets in Cork named after the British queen renamed. They describe the naming of streets after Queen Victoria as an insult to the dignity of the famine victims.

Judge Kelleher put the case back until May 17 for mention at Cork District Court to see if the issue has been determined by the High Court.

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