Latest: Taoiseach hopes Church will ‘reflect’ on its agreement in relation to Redress Scheme

LATEST: The Minister for Public Expenditure, Paschal Donohoe, has criticised the religious congregations for not applying the moral code they expect of others to themselves.

Latest: Taoiseach hopes Church will ‘reflect’ on its agreement in relation to Redress Scheme

Update 5.45pm:The Taoiseach has said he hopes the Church will reflect on the fact that it has only paid 13 per cent of the costs of a Commission of Investigation and redress scheme set up to help survivors of child sex abuse.

A report from the Comptroller and Auditor General published by the Department of Education reveals that by the end of 2015 the total costs of the commission which inquired into the child abuse, and the Redress Scheme, were an estimated €1.5bn.

Speaking in Brussels today, Enda Kenny said he hopes the Church measures up to what it agreed to originally.

“I would hope that the Church would reflect upon the agreement that it entered into; I hope the Church can measure up to what it agreed to originally.”

UPDATE 12.30pm: The Minister for Public Expenditure, Paschal Donohoe, has criticised the religious congregations for not applying the moral code they expect of others to themselves.

Mr Donohoe's comments come after it emerged none of the religious orders have paid anything near 50% of the 1.5 billion euro cost of the child abuse redress scheme.

Education Minister Richard Bruton says he intends to meet the church organisations to ask them for a greater contribution.

And the Public Expenditure Minister says they should be paying more.

"For our churches, who correctly point to the value of a higher moral code, it's particulary disappointing to see that code has not be adhered to in the contribution they have made."

UPDATE 9am: The Education Minister says he's 'massively disappointed' that religious orders are so far off their expected compensation for abuse survivors.

Richard Bruton plans to meet the groups to pursue it, after it was revealed they've only paid 13 per cent of payouts.

Minister Bruton says religious orders need to pay their share.

"I'm massively disappointed that 15 years on, from the indemnity agreement which relieved these religious orders from any cases being taken against them, we're still so far off meeting the level of contribution that is expected."

Earlier:A number of religious groups have been defending their contribution to the cost of the child abuse redress scheme.

It follows reports that just 13% has been received, of the promised 50-50 compensation split with the State.

The Christian Brothers say they are on course to fulfilling their voluntary pledge with €24m paid already and another €10m on the way.

The Sisters of Mercy says it has honoured all of its commitments. The Oblates of Mary Immaculate, who managed St Conleth's Reformatory in Daingean on behalf of the state until 1971, says it paid its voluntary contribution in full in 2013.

Initial estimates placed the cost of the redress scheme at €250m. However, the final bill is more than €1.5bn.

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