Gardai appeal over teenager's unsolved murder

Detectives today renewed an appeal for information about the unsolved murder of a young woman who was viciously knifed to death near her home three years ago.

Detectives today renewed an appeal for information about the unsolved murder of a young woman who was viciously knifed to death near her home three years ago.

Raonaid Murray was murdered in a well-to-do Dublin suburb in 1999, but despite interviewing 9,000 people and taking more than 3,000 statements, gardai have not found her killer.

The 17-year-old was repeatedly stabbed with a large, broad-bladed knife by her attacker, who was possibly lying in wait as she walked home from a pub.

She staggered about 100 yards towards her home after the attack before collapsing in Silchester Crescent, Glenageary, where she was discovered by her sister Sarah and two of her friends who had just arrived in a taxi.

At the time, Assistant Commissioner Jim McHugh described the murder as “a motiveless, very savage, vicious attack”, and added: “It is an investigation that we must solve and one we will solve.”

But today, on the third anniversary of her death, gardai still have not established a motive for the killing and despite several arrests, no one has been charged.

Police appealed for anyone who saw the last movements of Miss Murray after she left Scott’s pub in nearby Dun Laoghaire.

They also appealed for anyone who gave her a lift between Dun Laoghaire and Silchester Crescent or anyone who saw or heard a struggle in the street at around 12.10am on September 4, 1999.

A police spokesman said: “To date, gardai have interviewed 9,000 people and taken over 3,000 statements. Despite this and the fact that a reward of €190,000 has been pledged, gardai are still trying to catch Raonaid’s killer.”

The murder shattered the normally-peaceful 1950s suburb of Glenageary.

Her parents - Jim, a headmaster at Presentation College in Glasthule, and Deirdre - and her friends, said the killing was all the more shocking as she seemed not to have a single enemy.

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