UL partners with Stripe and Analog to change how computer science is taught

Students will complete residencies similar to medical students
UL partners with Stripe and Analog to change how computer science is taught

John Collison, president and co-founder of Stripe said the tech industry has nowhere near enough software engineers. Picture: Bloomberg

The University of Limerick is partnering with some of the world's leading tech companies including Stripe and Analog Devices to redefine the education of computer science.

UL has announced a new undergraduate and Masters degree in partnership with more than a dozen tech firms including Viotas, Shutterstock, Zalando, Shopify and Manna Aero.

The Immersive Software Engineering (ISE) programme aims to meet the increased demand for software developers and will bring the concept of ‘residencies’, which are more common to medical degrees, and use them as a key feature for the first time in computer science education.

During the four years, ISE students will complete five paid residencies, each between three and six months long with the participating tech firms. 

UL President, Professor Kerstin Mey: 'Effectively doing something that has never been done before'. Picture: Sean Curtin

UL President, Professor Kerstin Mey: 'Effectively doing something that has never been done before'. Picture: Sean Curtin

John Collison, the co-founder and President of payments company Stripe said the programme seeks to provide a great path for more secondary students - especially girls - into technology. "Software engineers enjoy incredible careers solving some of the world’s most important problems in the fastest growing industries, yet we have nowhere near enough of them," he said.

University of Limerick President, Professor Kerstin Mey said the partnership is an incredibly exciting one for the University. "Our industry partners have been invaluable in the conception of this disrupting programme, bringing their incredible industry experience to the benefit of our future graduates and effectively doing something that has never been done before in shaping and changing how computer science is taught in Ireland."

Software engineers and computer scientists can command high salaries straight out of university, and there is significant demand for more of them, with over three quarters of tech companies in Ireland saying the shortage of tech skills is losing them money.

Vincent Roche, CEO of Analog Devices (ADI) said the global demand for developing skilled software engineers is being driven by the connection of the physical to the cyber world and that big data processing is growing at an exponential rate. "As we at ADI solve the most challenging real-world problems in areas such as healthcare and industrial, we have an increasing demand for these skillsets and see the need growing in coming years."

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