Decline in air traffic continues

Flights landing during April were down 1.2% compared with last year, as arrivals and departures into the country’s three main airports continued to decline.

Shannon had the largest decline in flight numbers. There were 154 less flights into and out of Shannon — a fall of nearly 10%.

Figures for Dublin were relatively stable, with a decline of 0.1% or 12 flights. Cork Airport recorded 62 less flights or a decline of 3.4%, according to latest figures released by the Irish Aviation Authority.

A spokesperson for Ryanair said the figures were further proof that the Dublin Airport Authority was damaging tourism and employment.

“The Irish Aviation Authority’s confirmation of continued declines at DAA monopoly airports underlines the ongoing damage the DAA’s high fees are having on Irish tourism and jobs.

“Ryanair calls on the Government to take urgent action to address these declines by reversing the DAA monopoly’s 40% price increases, scrapping the failed tourist tax, and breaking up the failed DAA monopoly as soon as possible.”

The IAA did report some positive figures, with the number of flights that flew through Ireland without landing up 0.2%.

The IAA is also reporting that the outlook for the next year is more positive. It cited research from the International Air Transport Association which said that the chief financial officers and heads of cargo at airlines around the world were confident of an improvement in passenger traffic. However, historically high fuel prices remain a challenge for the industry.

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