UCC scientists discover new way to reconstruct what extinct animals looked like

UCC scientists discover new way to reconstruct what extinct animals looked like
Maria Mc Namara, Senior Lecturer and Valentina Rossi, PhD student with a fossil sample at the School of Biological, Earth and Envirnomental Sciences UCC. Pic Michael Mac Sweeney/Provision

UCC palaeontologists have discovered a new way to reconstruct the anatomy of ancient vertebrate animals bu analysing the chemistry of fossilized melanosomes from internal organs.

The study was published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America journal and was led by UCC's Valentina Rossi and her supervisor Dr Maria McNamara in collaboration with an international team of chemists from the US and Japan.

The team used cutting-edge synchrotron techniques to analyse the chemistry of the fossil and modern melanosomes using X-rays which allowed them to peer inside the anatomy of fossils and uncover hidden features.

The new study also showed melanin is abundant in internal organs of modern amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, and their fossil counterparts.

10 million-year-old fossil frog from Libros, Spain and X-ray map showing elevated levels of copper and zinc in the internal organs. Fossil photograph copyright the Natural History Museum, London. X-ray fluorescence map copyright Valentina Rossi.
10 million-year-old fossil frog from Libros, Spain and X-ray map showing elevated levels of copper and zinc in the internal organs. Fossil photograph copyright the Natural History Museum, London. X-ray fluorescence map copyright Valentina Rossi.

The team made the initial discovery of internal melanosomes last year on fossil frogs. The fossils are so well preserved, that even the melanin molecule can be detected.

Senior author of the study, Dr Maria McNamara said: “This discovery is remarkable in that it opens up a new avenue for reconstructing the anatomy of ancient animals. In some of our fossils we can identify skin, lungs, the liver, the gut, the heart, and even connective tissue.

"What’s more, this suggests that melanin had very ancient functions in regulating metal chemistry in the body going back tens, if not hundreds, of millions of years.”

10 million-year-old fossil tadpole from Libros, Spain and X-ray map showing elevated levels of titanium in the skin, eye and especially the liver. X-ray fluorescence map copyright Valentina Rossi.
10 million-year-old fossil tadpole from Libros, Spain and X-ray map showing elevated levels of titanium in the skin, eye and especially the liver. X-ray fluorescence map copyright Valentina Rossi.

Rossi said: "After the pilot study, we had a hunch that these features would turn out to be more widespread across vertebrates. But we never guessed that the chemistry would be different in different organs,” Rossi said.

The advent of new synchrotron X-ray analysis techniques “allows us to harness the energy of really fast-moving electrons to detect minute quantities of different metals in the melanosomes.”

The study will be available here once published: www.pnas.org/content/early/2019/08/13/1820285116

More on this topic

Would you swap your partner for a robot designed to be 'the one'?Would you swap your partner for a robot designed to be 'the one'?

Peanut allergies affected by exercise and sleep deprivation, study suggestsPeanut allergies affected by exercise and sleep deprivation, study suggests

Irish student, 17, wins top prize at EU Contest for Young ScientistsIrish student, 17, wins top prize at EU Contest for Young Scientists

Female pupils ‘don’t know enough about STEM subjects’Female pupils ‘don’t know enough about STEM subjects’


More in this Section

Someone is €500,000 richer after winning EuroMillions Plus drawSomeone is €500,000 richer after winning EuroMillions Plus draw

Could robots steal our hearts as well as our jobs?Could robots steal our hearts as well as our jobs?

Missing woman forest search finds ‘nothing of significance’Missing woman forest search finds ‘nothing of significance’

Lunney family endured ‘week from hell’ after Quinn executive abducted and attackedLunney family endured ‘week from hell’ after Quinn executive abducted and attacked


Lifestyle

For an instant supper or lunch, fishcakes can be nourishing, warming and tasty. To complete a balanced meal, all it takes is some stirfried or roasted root vegetables.Taste of the sea: Top 8 fish cakes

My seven-year-old stood tall, whispered “bravery” to herself and stepped into the pitch-black dungeon. I stood there and watched her disappear.Learner Dad: I hate nostalgia, I think it’s mawkish and sentimental

Dr Phil Kieran says head lice is incredibly common among school children and offers practical advice on how to remove the crawlers with easy treatments.Tackling head lice: Easy treatments to remove itchy creepers

Gráinne Healy only started running regularly a few years ago. She’s already completed 50 parkruns. She tells Rowena Walsh what motivates her.Ageing with Attitude: Parkruns and quiet Friday nights

More From The Irish Examiner