Trinity seeks to admit fees-free direct provision students

Trinity seeks to admit fees-free direct provision students

Trinity College Dublin is looking for a way to admit, free of any fees, students living in direct provision.

College provost Dr Patrick Prendergast said a taskforce would examine ways of getting students, from direct provision, who do well in the Leaving Cert into TCD.

He described the asylum seeker accommodation system used in Ireland as “a terrible thing”, in an interview published in the current issue of Hot Press.

Young people in direct provision are classified as non-EU students and that means they are obliged to pay the non-EU college fee – upwards of €20,000.

“They can't afford the EU fee of €3,000, let alone the higher amount,” he said.

Dr Prendergast said they wanted students from direct provision to come to TCD as they would increase the cultural diversity of the college community.

We want them here. They would add to our diversity and bring brains, intelligence, commitment and motivation to the university.

He also reflected on whether the Government would be supportive of the college admitting students in direct provision free of fees.

“I suppose they're worried that we might become known as a country that you could come to as an asylum-seeking student and then get a free education.

"But would that be a bad thing?"

Dr Prendergast also warned about the negative effect that a no-deal Brexit would have on TCD and other Irish universities.

“It would be very bad for Trinity and for all Irish third level institutions because student mobility will change,” he said.

Dr Prendergast said Trinity saw itself as a university for the whole island of Ireland.

“We've made a big effort to have more students from Northern Ireland come south. The number had been increasing by about 20% every year but, in 2018, it dropped by 20% because of the uncertainty.

“A student from, say, Derry is going to be a non-EU student and therefore have to pay five times as much in fees.”

Trinity, meanwhile, has developed a global relations strategy which has doubled international student enrolments.

More on this topic

Direct Provision scholarships: Hope found in sanctuary of educationDirect Provision scholarships: Hope found in sanctuary of education

Equality commission 'concerned' about effect of housing crisis on asylum seekers in Direct ProvisionEquality commission 'concerned' about effect of housing crisis on asylum seekers in Direct Provision

Public calling for radical change to direct provision systemPublic calling for radical change to direct provision system

LGBT asylum seekers face double isolationLGBT asylum seekers face double isolation

More in this Section

Children 'need their dad back' says wife of Cork man facing deportation from US Children 'need their dad back' says wife of Cork man facing deportation from US

New study to give voice to 'hidden group' affected by child sexual abuseNew study to give voice to 'hidden group' affected by child sexual abuse

Katherine Zappone to discuss importance of children's rights at UN forumKatherine Zappone to discuss importance of children's rights at UN forum

Concern that 100 permanent consultant psychiatric jobs remain unfilledConcern that 100 permanent consultant psychiatric jobs remain unfilled


Lifestyle

Their romance took Laura Roset and Ken Mohally from Mallow to Moldova and back again.Wedding of the Week: Love spreads from Mallow to Moldova

As the Caped Crusader hits 80 years of protecting Gotham City, Chris Wasser looks at the history of the world’s darkest superhero.80 years on, Batman still packs a punch

Despite the many issues in the housing market, the number of mortgages being approved is rising, with first-time buyers making up the bulkMaking Cents: Key points for people buying their first house

When it comes to music podcasts, the actual tunes themselves are not essential — the best series discuss around the music.Podcast Corner: Digging deep with music podcasts

More From The Irish Examiner