Study finds 35% of under 35 have mental health issues

Study finds 35% of under 35 have mental health issues

Stress, anxiety and mental health issues are more common among under 35s, according to a new study.

Research by Aviva found that 54% of under 35s claim that they or someone close to them experience stress or anxiety, with 35% admitting to having mental health issues.

Compared to other age groups, on average 41% of men and 45% of women reported stress or anxiety and 21% of men and 28% of women claiming mental health issues.

Aviva's survey found that men claimed to be putting in the longest hours worked outside the home with 61% saying they worked between 36-50 hours versus 36% of women.

The survey also found that females, younger workers and those working longer hours are much more likely to have cancelled a healthcare appointment due to work commitments.

When it came to exercise females and those aged 25-44 are getting the least exercise at under four hours per week.

57% of 18-24-year-olds are targeting looking after their mental health and reducing stress levels amongst their top three priorities.

"These research findings are stark – both from the perspective of the number of young people citing anxiety, stress and mental health issues alongside the lack of any financial provision if they were unable to work or indeed lost their job," said Karen Gallagher, Aviva Life & Pensions.

"It is evident that people are conscious of the need to look after their mental health however, it is not always possible to prevent issues arising and a level of protection should be in place."

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