No plans for Ireland to ground 737 Max aircraft

No plans for Ireland to ground 737 Max aircraft

The type of plane involved in the Ethiopian Airlines and Lion Air crashes in the past five months has carried thousands of passengers to and from Ireland — and aviation authorities have no plans to ground 737 Max aircraft.

China, Ethiopia, and Indonesia grounded Boeing’s 737 Max planes following the crash that killed 157 passengers and crew shortly after taking off from Addis Ababa on Sunday, and five months after a Lion Air flight plunged into the sea off Indonesia minutes after taking off in October, killing 189.

Norwegian Air International is among the airlines that use Boeing’s 737 Max, flying thousands of passengers from Irish airports to the US east coast over the past 18 months, including Cork’s first ever transatlantic flights to Providence, Rhode Island.

The airline said it has no plans to ground the planes, which are coming under scrutiny from experts across the world.

Ryanair is due to take delivery of its first 737 Max next month, a plane it has described as a “game-changer for its modern capabilities including fewer emissions and more fuel efficiency.

Ryanair has options of up to 210 aircraft in the coming years, while Boeing has taken over 5,000 orders from airlines across the world.

The Irish Aviation Authority said: “We await further information from the accident investigation team, the manufacturer Boeing, the US Federal Aviation Administration, and the European Aviation Safety Agency on the circumstances of this accident.

“There are a small number of 737 Max aircraft on the Irish aircraft register. As safety is paramount to passenger and aircraft operating crews, the IAA will issue notification to all operators of Irish-registered 737 Max as soon as any further information becomes available.”

At one point yesterday, Boeing shares fell the most since the September 11, 2001, attacks.

No plans for Ireland to ground 737 Max aircraft

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