'I had nothing to do with this': Ian Bailey reaffirms innocence but feels conviction is 'inevitable'

'I had nothing to do with this': Ian Bailey reaffirms innocence but feels conviction is 'inevitable'
Ian Bailey

Ian Bailey has said that it is "inevitable" that he will be found guilty of the murder of Sophie Toscan du Plantier - however he has reaffirmed his insistence that he is an innocent man.

Ms Toscan du Plantier was killed in December 1996 and Mr Bailey, a British citizen who lives in Co Cork has denied any involvement.

Speaking to Virgin Media News in an interview to be aired this evening, Mr Bailey said that he expects to be convicted at his French trial in May.

"I'm greatly imperiled here," he said. "I know that I had nothing to do with this and I'm going to finish up a convicted murderer.

"I'm actually an innocent man and what will happen in France is that they will probably celebrate the fact that I've been convicted," he claimed, adding: "All they'll have succeeded in doing is convicting an innocent man."

Mr Bailey, who says he will not attend the trial, believes he will need a "miracle" to escape a conviction.

"I know there are people here in Ireland, in Bantry and even very close by to the hotel we're in (for the interview), know that I have nothing to do with this and short of a miracle or an intervention or some new information coming out, it would appear inevitable that at a point later this year, I'll become a convicted murderer in France."

The case was recently the subject of a podcast West Cork, hosted by British journalists Jennifer Forde and Sam Bungey which has increased the international attention surrounding the case.

In 2012, the Irish Supreme Court stopped a French bid to have him extradited.

Under French law, Mr Bailey can be tried in absentia meaning the court can try him for the murder of a French citizen - even if the crime did not take place in France.

No one was ever charged with the murder of Sophie Toscan du Plantier in Ireland.

- The full interview airs on Virgin Media News today at 5:30pm and 8pm on Virgin Media One

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