Drinking water in areas has up to 10 and 11 times more lead than allowed

Drinking water in areas has up to 10 and 11 times more lead than allowed

Drinking water in three supplies in Ireland has been found to have at least 10 times the maximum allowable limit of lead.

There were more than 20 positive tests across the country, according to Irish Water's most recent inspections.

The HSE's website says lead may harm kidneys, contribute to high blood pressure and cause cancer.

Under the Freedom of Information Act, Irish Water has released details of its most recent test results for the substance.

Water in 23 supplies across the country was found to have above the permitted level.

Lead of 11 times the limit was detected in Dublin City Council's Leixlip supply - which serves much of north and west of the capital city.

Water on Dun Laoghaire/Rathdown County Council's Roundwood Reservoir Supply - which serves places like Leopardstown and Stillorgan village - had ten times the limit.

And lead of nearly ten times the threshold was found in the Castlerea Public Water Supply in Co Roscommon.

Environmental consultant Jack O'Sullivan says the results are a major concern.

"You can imagine lead being a little bit above normal but 10 and 11 times above normal is absolutely horrific," he said.

"The problem with that is lead in water can affect children. It's very harmful to young children because they absorb maybe four or five times the amount of lead than an adult would. It's also harmful to the unborn as well."

Irish Water says the 23 exceedances arose from the presence of lead pipework within the properties in question, and is therefore the owners' responsibility.


More in this Section

Centre is shifting, warns DonohoeCentre is shifting, warns Donohoe

Two dead, man in hospital after crash in CavanTwo dead, man in hospital after crash in Cavan

Coronavirus: HSE advises mass-goers not to shake hands to stop virus spreadCoronavirus: HSE advises mass-goers not to shake hands to stop virus spread

Work on €180m Limerick development to begin this yearWork on €180m Limerick development to begin this year


Lifestyle

Spring has sprung and a new Munster festival promises to celebrate its arrival with gusto, says Eve Kelliher.Spring has sprung: Munster festival promises to celebrate with gusto

The spotlight will fall on two Munster architects in a new showcase this year.Munster architects poised to build on their strengths

Prepare to fall for leather, whatever the weather, says Annmarie O'Connor.Trend of the week: It's always leather weather

The starting point for Michael West’s new play, in this joint production by Corn Exchange and the Abbey, is an alternative, though highly familiar, 1970s Ireland. You know, elections every few weeks, bad suits, wide ties, and a seedy nexus of politics and property development.Theatre Review: The Fall of the Second Republic at Abbey Theatre, Dublin

More From The Irish Examiner